| Read Time: 2 minutes | Criminal Defense

Florida Governor Signs Bill to Combat Opioid Epidemic

Drugs are widely used in the United States, but it’s not just illegal ones that are leading to criminal charges and deaths. Prescription drugs have become an epidemic in the country over the past decade. People are living longer and relying on painkillers to help them feel good. The problem with prescription drugs, though, is that they stop working after a while. They become less effective, so some people take more and more. As a result, many overdose and die. Opioids are the most commonly used prescription drugs, and they are causing numerous deaths across the United States. People are also selling them to make money, which is considered illegal sale of prescription drugs. This is often a felony crime. Fortunately, Florida is being proactive and taking steps to combat this crisis. Gov. Rick Scott recently signed a new law that will place stricter limits on opioid use in a bid to address the epidemic, which claims at least 16 lives a day in Florida alone. The comprehensive measure will include education programs and limited availability of these addictive drugs. The state legislature has made combating the opioid epidemic a priority. The new law will earmark more money for education programs. It will place tougher limits on opioid prescriptions. It will also require that doctors check the state database and make sure that patients are not “doctor shopping” and getting prescriptions from multiple health care providers. The situation is dire in Florida. Between 2015 and 2016, opioid overdose deaths skyrocketed 35 percent. In 2016, opioids were responsible for the deaths of 5,725 people in the state. Fentanyl is the most popular opioid in some areas of Florida. Some versions of fentanyl can be 5,000 times more lethal than heroin. Manatee County suffered the highest rate of deaths from this drug in 2016. The new law, which takes effect July 1, has a goal of reducing the number of prescription drug addicts in Florida. It will place the toughest restrictions on Schedule II drugs such as fentanyl and oxycontin. Doctors would be able to prescribe only a three-day limit, although a seven-day limit would be allowed in some cases. There would be no limit for those with chronic pain, trauma or a terminal illness such as cancer. The new law includes an upgrade to Florida’s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program. It would make it easier to track a person’s medication history across the nation. This means that doctors in adjacent states could track a Florida resident’s prescriptions and refuse to fill any if it appears the person is attempting to get prescriptions from multiple doctors. Contact an Orlando Criminal Defense Attorney Today Even though prescription drugs are often obtained legally, you can still get in legal trouble for fraud and illegal possession and sale relates to these drugs. You could face felony charges for selling prescription drugs. If this is the case for you, you need legal help right away. Contact the aggressive criminal defense lawyers at Moses & Rooth. We will assess every aspect of your case to help you formulate a solid defense. Schedule your free consultation today. Call our office at (407) 377-0150 or contact us online.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Criminal Defense

Brother of FL Mass Murder Suspect Held on $500k Bond for Trespassing

The mass shooting that happened in February 2018 at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida is still on the minds of many. Victims who survived are still recovering from the tragedy. The 19-year-old boy who committed the crime is currently behind bars. But authorities believe that a threat still exists: the boy’s younger brother. While the boy allegedly does not understand why his older brother would do such a thing, police believe the boy has the red flags as his brother, especially after a trespassing incident at the same Parkland school where 17 people were killed by his brother. The younger brother was warned to stay away from the school after the mass shooting. However, he was recently caught at the school. He was arrested on March 19 after security cameras caught him trespassing on school grounds. He got past all locked gates and doors and proceeded to ride his skateboard on school property. The boy told authorities that he was at the school to “reflect on the school shooting and soak it in.” The boy was adopted at a young age and left orphaned when his adoptive parents died. His caretaker was in New York at the time of his arrest. Trespassing charges are often minor in Florida. Typical bail is set at $25. However, for the boy, bail was set at a whopping $500,000. The boy’s lawyer claims that the boy is being charged and punished simply because of who he is related to, not because of the actual crime. Students and parents at the school do find the boy’s actions suspicious. They aren’t sure he would do the same thing as his brother, but then again, parents have accused the school of not seeing the red flags that his older brother had when he was a student there. In their minds, it’s better to be safe than sorry. Florida’s Trespassing Laws Under Florida Statutes Section 810.09, trespassing on a property other than a structure or conveyance is punishable by a first degree misdemeanor. This crime is punishable by one year in jail and a $1,000 fine. Depending on the circumstances, probation or other forms of punishment may be handed down instead. Trespassing may include any of the following: Entering a person’s property to interfere with business Living in someone else’s house without their permission Refusing to leave someone’s else property after the owner has asked you to leave Refusing to leave a place of business or other public building while it is closed to the public and an employee has asked you to leave Let Our Orlando, Florida Criminal Defense Attorneys Help You It appears that in this case, the boy was targeted simply because he is the brother of a mass murderer. This does not make a family member a mass murderer as well. His trespassing crime should not have been charged so harshly as it was. If your teen has been charged with a criminal offense, it’s important to take swift action. Contact the aggressive Orlando criminal defense lawyers at Moses & Rooth. We will make sure your teen understands his or her legal rights and get the charges reduced or dropped altogether. We are available 24/7. To schedule your free consultation, give us a call at (407) 377-0150 or contact us online today.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | DUI

What is the Florida Safety Council DUI Course?

If you are convicted of a DUI in Florida, a first offense can cost you your driver’s license for up to one year. This is in addition to other potential penalties, which include a $1,000 fine, six months in jail, the mandatory impoundment of your care for at least 10 days, and a requirement to use an ignition interlock device for six months after you get your license back. The judge can also order you to complete a term of community service and complete an approved DUI course. First-Time Offenders Must Complete 12 Hours of Classes The Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (DHSMV) certifies private, non-profit organizations to conduct DUI classes. The Department requires at least 12 hours of classes following a first-time DUI offense. For multiple offenders, the minimum amount of class time increases to 21 hours. The Florida Safety Council is one of the best known state-approved DUI schools. Founded in 1953, the Florida Safety Council operates classrooms and driving ranges throughout Orlando and the state of Florida. In addition to DUI classes, the Florida Safety Council also conducts workplace safety training and mandatory substance abuse classes for all first-time drivers in the state. For level 1 DUI offenders–that is, the first-timers class–the Florida Safety Council’s course costs $270. The program must be completed within 90 days. Failure to do so will result in a forfeiture of fees, and the court, the DHSMV, and your probation officer (if applicable) will be notified. Remember, when a DUI course is required as part of a sentence, it is mandatory, and you could face additional criminal penalties if you do not successfully complete all requirements. The DUI class itself is designed to educate offenders about the potential harms of driving while drunk. The subject material includes but is not necessarily limited to: Explaining the effects of alcohol and other drugs on the body, and more specifically how they impact a person’s ability to safely operate a motor vehicle; Discussing the basic Florida laws and court procedures regarding traffic offenses and driving under the influence; Helping participants identify alternatives to driving under the influence in the future; and Providing participants with information about local resources to help them address drug or alcohol abuse going forward. Keep in mind, these DUI classes are highly structured pursuant to DHSMV regulations. The Florida Safety Council advises all participants that the enrollment process takes at least 2 hours to complete. You will need to bring a significant amount of paperwork to the enrollment, including photo ID, proof of residency in the Orlando area, and documentation related to your DUI arrest and conviction. Helping You to Avoid a Florida DUI Conviction The best way to avoid the need for DUI classes in the first place is not to get convicted of drunk driving. Even if you have no prior record, a DUI can have a significant impact on you and your family. This is why you should work with a qualified Orlando DUI defense attorney anytime you are arrested on suspicion of drunk driving. Call the offices of Moses & Rooth, Attorneys at Law, at (407) 377-0150 or contact us online to schedule a free consultation with a member of our team today.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Drug Charges

Does Florida have a Heroin Epidemic?

There has been a lot of talk in the news recently about the effects of unchecked opioid abuse in Florida and throughout the country. Sadly, this is not just a case of media hype. Opioids such as heroin, fentanyl, and oxycodone are highly addictive–and fatal. According to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, in 2015 there were nearly 3,900 opioid-related deaths reported in the state. As reported by NBC News, this reflected nearly 12 percent of all fatal opioid doses in the United States for 2015, the last year for which complete data was available. Central Florida Governments Focus on Treatment, Preventing Deaths Here in the Orlando area, the Orange County sheriff’s office has responded to more than 150 calls related to heroin and opioid overdoses during the first few weeks of 2018. Local law enforcement and public health officials have responded by providing training in administering naloxone, a drug that can “override the effects of an overdose” and potentially save an addicted person’s life, according to a report by Fox 35 television in Orlando. Other central Florida law enforcement agencies are taking a similar proactive stance in combating the heroin epidemic. In Marion County, Ocala police chief Greg Graham told the media at a February 6 press conference that his officers responded to 78 opioid overdoses in his city during 2017. Sadly, 16 of these overdoses were fatal, and the “average age” of the deceased individuals was just 38 years old. In an attempt to curb this epidemic, Graham and Ocala Mayor Kent Guinn announced the city would implement an “amnesty initiative.” This will allow individuals who suffer from opioid addiction to approach local authorities and seek treatment without fear of criminal prosecution. As police chief Graham noted, there was no way to “arrest our way out of this crisis,” although he said officers would pick up struggling addicts and take them to a treatment facility. Graham emphasized, however, that amnesty would not protect anyone caught selling or distributing heroin or other opioids in Ocala. To the contrary, the chief told the local press his department was actively pursuing at least two separate criminal cases right now. And he said he was prepared to seek murder charges against dealers whose opioids could be directly tied to overdose deaths. Heroin Possession Remains a Felony in Florida Indeed, do not confuse public health efforts to combat opioid addiction with a loosening of Florida’s strict heroin laws. Opioids are not treated the same as “recreational” drugs such as marijuana. Possession of any quantity of heroin or fentanyl–even trace amounts found in your vehicle–is a third-degree felony in Florida. This means you could be sent to jail for five years and ordered to pay a $5,000 fine. Especially in the current political climate surrounding opioids, do not allow police or prosecutors to run roughshod over your constitutional rights. If you are charged with possession of heroin or any other dangerous drug, you need to speak with an experienced Orlando criminal defense attorney right away. Call the offices of Moses & Rooth, Attorneys at Law, at (407) 377-0150 today if you need immediate legal assistance.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Domestic Violence

Is Domestic Violence a Public Health Issue?

We all understand that domestic violence is a serious problem in Florida. Indeed, many of us personally know someone who has been affected by acts of domestic abuse or violence. But beyond the individual victims, what does domestic abuse look like in the aggregate? The Global Problem of Intimate Partner Violence The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have both long treated domestic violence as a public health issue and not simply a matter of law enforcement. These agencies study the impact of “intimate partner violence” (IPV) on both women and men from a scientific perspective. Unlike the legal system, which primarily focuses on identifying and punishing known abusers, the public health agencies are more concerned with identifying the root causes of IPV and implementing strategies to prevent it from happening in the first place. According to the CDC, about 25 percent of women and 11 percent of men in the United States have experienced some form of IPV. The CDC defines domestic violence as taking place on a “spectrum.” So while some IPV situations were limited to a single incident, other cases involve a series of “severe episodes” over a period of weeks, months, or years. In this context, IPV incorporates physical abuse and sexual assault, as well as stalking and other intentional behaviors designed to make the victim afraid for their life or safety. So how do these figures add up to a public health crisis? Based on research compiled by WHO, there are substantial “negative health and development consequences” to IPV victims, especially women. In addition to the immediate consequences of the violent acts–which is often death–WHO said IPV “is also an important cause of morbidity from multiple mental, physical, sexual and reproductive health outcomes, and it is also linked with known risk factors for poor health, such as alcohol and drug use, smoking and unsafe sex.” Ultimately, domestic violence puts a strain on the entire health care and social services system. WHO noted that violence against women cost Canada’s national healthcare system almost CAN$1.1 billion. In addition to these direct costs, IPV also frequently “undermines efforts to improve women’s access to education,” limiting their ability to secure better-paying jobs that enable them to escape abusive relationships. Preventing Violence Before the Courts Get Involved IPV generally begins in adolescence or young adulthood. Based on the CDC’s figures, 71 percent of women experience an IPV incident before the age of 25. That is why the CDC and WHO say it is critical for parents and the community at-large to “teach safe and healthy relationship skills” to adolescents. It is also important to identify individuals who are at greater risk of IPV and intervene before legal action becomes necessary. And if the law does have to get involved, remember the accused still has constitutional rights that must be respected. If you are charged with any kind of domestic abuse or violence, you have the right to speak to a qualified Orlando criminal defense lawyer. Call the offices of Moses & Rooth, Attorneys at Law, at (407) 377-0150 or contact us online today if you need immediate assistance.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Criminal Defense

Orlando Ranked One of the Top Murder Capitals in America

Although violent crime has seen a decrease nationally, at least according to the most recent statistics from the Federal Bureau of Investigation, murder remains a major problem. Indeed, the FBI said reports of murder and “non-negligent manslaughter” increased 1.5 percent from the first six months of 2016 to the same time period in 2017. Pulse Nightclub Attack Causes Orlando Murder Rate to Soar Crime statistics are always subject to anomalies. That is the case here in Orlando, where news headlines recently touted the city was now “ranked among top murder capitals in America.” But when you dig a bit deeper, that headline is somewhat misleading. What happened was this. NeighborhoodScout, an online analytics database, recently published an article counting down the “top 30 cities in the U.S. with the highest murder rates.” The murder rate is essentially the number of murders committed per 1,000 residents. NeighborhoodScout examined FBI figures for cities with at least 25,000 people in compiling its top-30 ranking. Orlando came in at number 20. The city reported 84 murders within a population of about 277,000, for a murder rate of 0.30. This was six times the national murder rate of 0.05. Orlando also exceeded the national averages for other violent crimes, including rape, robbery, and assault. Now there is an important caveat to all this. The 84 murders cited by the NeighborhoodScout rankings were reported during 2016, the last full year for which reliable crime statistics are available. As everyone who lives in and around Orlando remembers, in June 2016 there was a mass shooting at the nightclub Pulse, which accounted for 49 of those 84 murders. Obviously, this was an anomalous event that exaggerated Orlando’s normal murder rate. In fact, the Orlando Police Department reported far fewer homicides in 2017 than 2016, according to a January report in the Orlando Sentinel. OPD only had 25 active murder cases last year, of which 21 were solved. These 2017 murders included one other mass shooting, the killing of five people at a business on Forsyth Road. It should also be noted that one other Florida city made the NeighborhoodScout top 30 list. Lake Worth, a city in Palm Beach County, with approximately 34,000 residents, was actually the 30th and final municipality to make the ranking. With just 10 murders in 2016, that was enough to give Lake Worth a murder rate of 0.26. Protecting Your Right to a Vigorous Criminal Defense Regardless of how you look at the numbers, even one murder is one too many. Unfortunately, media reporting of crime statistics often drives a frenzied rush to judgment whenever a person is accused of murder. But even a person accused of this most heinous of violent crimes still has constitutional rights. Remember, an accusation is not a conviction, and if you find yourself accused of murder, you have the right to mount a vigorous defense. At the offices of Moses & Rooth, Attorneys at Law, we represent Orlando-area residents who are accused of all types of violent crimes, including murder, robbery, and assault. We fight to ensure that no person is sent to prison unless the prosecution proves its case beyond a reasonable doubt. Call us today at (407) 377-0150 if you have been charged with a crime and need immediate assistance.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Criminal Defense

How Much Marijuana Can I Possess Before it is Considered a Felony?

How Much Weed Is A Felony in Florida? To many people, marijuana is considered a harmless drug. However, given that the laws vary from state to state, many would disagree. While it may seem as though marijuana is pretty much decriminalized in the United States, some states still have harsh penalties in place when it comes to possession of the drug. Florida, on the other hand, is one of the strictest states in the nation. It’s not lenient at all, even for first-time offenders. Medical marijuana was only just approved in the state, and it comes with numerous restrictions. For example, marijuana cannot be smoked, but it can be used in other forms. Possession of any amount can get you in trouble with the law. You could face a misdemeanor for having even the smallest amount on you, and it doesn’t take much to get a felony on your criminal record. Florida Marijuana Laws – How Many Grams Is A Felony? If you are caught in possession of 20 grams or less of marijuana, you will face misdemeanor charges. The penalties include a $1,000 fine and one year in jail. Keep in mind that 20 grams is a very small amount—just 0.705 ounces. And if you’re caught with any amount over 20 grams, the penalties get much stiffer, as you’ll be charged with a felony. If you are in possession of anywhere between 20 grams and 25 pounds of marijuana, the penalties include up to five years in prison and a $5,000 fine. If you are in possession of the drug within 1,000 feet of a school or park, it is also considered a felony, punishable by a $10,000 fine and 15 years in prison. If you are caught with 25-2,000 pounds of marijuana, this is a felony charge punishable by 3-15 years in prison and a $25,000 fine. If you have anywhere from 2,000-10,000 pounds of the drug in your possession, you will face 7-30 years in prison and a $50,000 fine. If you are in possession of 10,000 pounds or more, you will face a hefty fine of $200,000 as well as 15-30 years in prison. Possession of drug paraphernalia is classified as a misdemeanor, which carries a fine of $1,000 and up to one year in jail. In addition to the above penalties, any marijuana conviction can cause a person’s driver’s license to be suspended for one year. Contact an Orlando Marijuana Defense Attorney Marijuana possession can be a state and federal crime, depending on the circumstances. While possession of marijuana has been basically decriminalized in many states, it is still considered a federal crime. Drug laws can be confusing, especially when it comes to marijuana. Even the smallest amount can get you charged with a felony in Florida. Let the aggressive Orlando criminal defense attorneys at Moses & Rooth Attorneys at Law defend you against the drug charges you face, no matter how serious. We are available 24/7 to assist you, so give us a call today at (407) 377-0150 to schedule a free consultation.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Criminal Defense

What is Simple Battery in Florida?

Assault and battery are two crimes that are often related, but they are different. Assault involves the use of threats toward another person. No physical contact is involved. When a person touches another person without his or her consent, it becomes battery. Battery can range in severity from the first-degree misdemeanor to a first-degree felony. You may be forced to spend time in jail and pay hefty fines, depending on the circumstances of your case. Types of Battery in Florida Battery charges vary from state to state. Florida recognizes three types of battery: simple battery, aggravated battery and felony battery. Under Florida Statutes Section 784.03, battery occurs when a person touches or strikes another person without consent, or intentionally causes bodily harm to another person. Simple battery is the least serious form of battery. It involves offense touching o physical contact that has resulted in minor injuries. It is classified as a first degree misdemeanor, which is punishable by a $1,000 fine and up to one year in jail. Simple battery is the only form of battery that is charged as a misdemeanor. Felony battery occurs when you hit or strike someone and cause serious injury, or when you have previously been convicted of battery. It is a third degree felony, punishable by a $5,000 fine and up to five years in prison. Aggravated battery is the most serious form of battery, as it often involves serious injury with a deadly weapon. It is a second degree felony. Penalties include a $10,000 fine and up to 15 years in prison. Defenses to Battery If you have been accused of battery, there are several defenses you can possibly use. The most common one is self-defense. If another person hit you first, you can claim that you hit the person because he or she initiated the physical contact. You can also claim that you were defending another person or property. For example, if you assaulted a person who was trying to kill your dog or steal your car, you might get the charges dropped. If you accidentally hit the person—for example, you bumped into the person—you did not intend to harm the person and therefore you would not face charges. Another defense is that you were given consent to touch the person. For example, if your girlfriend gave you permission to kiss her, she cannot accuse you of battery. Contact an Orlando, Florida Criminal Defense Attorney While simple battery is only a misdemeanor, there are situations in which a battery charge can become a felony. A felony charge which comes with many consequences and could affect you for the rest of your life. That’s why you shouldn’t handle such a charge on your own. You need a solid defense to reduce your charges and penalties. The aggressive Orlando, Florida criminal defense attorneys at Moses & Rooth Attorneys at Law can provide solid criminal defense for those accused of simple battery and other crimes. Contact us today at (407) 377-0150 to schedule a free consultation. We are available 24/7 to assist you.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Orlando News

Restoration of Voting Rights Federal Case

Florida’s continued punishment of felons long after they have served out their sentence has become a hot button issue.  We discussed restoration of felon voting rights back in August of 2016 and this topic has continued to be argued in our state ever since then.  In fact, Florida voters will have the opportunity to allow the restoration of felon voting rights on the November 6, 2018 ballot.  This is big news and very important. Now a Federal Judge has examined the restoration of voting rights in Florida and has found it to be unconstitutional.  Judge Mark Walker found that Florida’s current scheme for “re-enfranchisement” violates both the First Amendment rights to free association and expression, and the Fourteenth Amendment’s Equal Protection Clause. View Order on Cross-Motions for Summary Judgement James Michael Hand, et al., Plaintiffs vs Rick Scott, et al., Defendants From the very beginning of his option Judge Walker was very critical of the current process to restore voting rights.  He starts his opinion: Florida strips the right to vote from every man and woman who commits a felony. To vote again, disenfranchised citizens must kowtow before a panel of high-level government officials over which Florida’s Governor has absolute veto authority. No standards guide the panel. Its members alone must be satisfied that these citizens deserve restoration. Until that moment (if it ever comes), these citizens cannot legally vote for presidents, governors, senators, representatives, mayors, or school-board members. These citizens are subject to the consequences of bills, actions, programs, and policies that their elected leaders enact and enforce. But these citizens cannot ever legally vote unless Florida’s Governor approves restoration of this fundamental right. Florida’s Executive Clemency Board has, by rule, unfettered discretion in restoring voting rights. “We can do whatever we want,” the Governor said at one clemency hearing.  One need not search long to find alarming illustrations of this scheme in action. In 2010, a white man, Steven Warner, cast an illegal ballot. Three years later, he sought the restoration of his voting rights. He went before the state’s Executive Clemency Board, where Governor Scott asked him about his illegal voting. “Actually, I voted for you,” he said. The Governor laughed. “I probably shouldn’t respond to that.” A few seconds passed. The Governor then granted the former felon his voting rights. …In Florida, elected, partisan officials have extraordinary authority to grant or withhold the right to vote from hundreds of thousands of people without any constraints, guidelines, or standards. The question now is whether such a system passes constitutional muster. It does not. Judge Walker has ordered all parties to file a brief related to remedies and will then enter a final judgment after considering he additional briefs. Governor Scott’s office issued a statement that indicated that the discretion of the clemency board over the restoration of voting rights had been in place for decades and over multiple governors.  While technically this is accurate, the current scheme administered under the Scott administration is by far more restrictive than previous governors.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Criminal Defense

Fire Chief Being Charged With Trespassing While Duck Hunting

Hunting is a popular activity over the country, especially in Florida, where the weather is beautiful and animals abound. Just like any sport, though, there are rules that need to be followed. When certain rules are not followed—such as hunting on private property without permission—criminal charges may apply. A fire chief from Orlando is facing charges for hunting without authorization. The 46-year-old man, Danny Wilson, was linked to a group of people hunting with firearms and trespassing. The man was arrested on December 30, but the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission was made aware of the incident on December 17. They came across an empty boat on Lake Florence. The driver of the boat—a 22-year-old Tallahassee man—told authorities that he and others in the group had camped out on public property the night before and that they did not jump the fence. Authorities followed a trail and found shotgun shells and hunting blinds. The fire chief and eight other people were seen inside a fenced-in cattle ranch in a photo posted on Instagram.The group had used a hunting app called onX Hunting to look for areas to hunt. The property owner, however, said nobody was allowed to hunt on the property. Wilson reported his arrest to the Orlando Fire Department. He is now performing administrative duties while the incident is being investigated. Wilson has faced disciplinary action before. Last summer, he was caught promoting a fishing business on YouTube while using a fire department vehicle. He was suspended without pay for 72 hours and was asked to take down the video, which he did. Florida Trespassing Laws Under Florida Statutes Section 810.08, a trespasser refers to someone who willing enters a structure or property without being invited or authorized to do so, is asked to leave and refuses to do so. This is a second degree misdemeanor, punishable by 60 days in jail and a $500 fine. If a person is on the property or inside the structure at the time the trespassing occurs, the charge is elevated to a first degree misdemeanor, which could mean a fine of $1,000 and one year in jail. When a person is caught trespassing and is armed with a firearm or other dangerous weapon, the charge is elevated to a third degree felony. The punishment for this crime is a $5,000 fine, as well as five years in prison and another five years on probation. Considering that the fire chief was hunting on the property with firearms, he could potentially face felony charges. Contact an Orlando Criminal Defense Attorney for Help Property owners do not want people on their land without permission. When a person enters another person’s property without permission—especially for the purpose of hunting—he or she can face criminal charges. Don’t handle your charges on your own. The aggressive Orlando criminal defense attorneys at Moses & Rooth Attorneys at Law can provide solid criminal defense for those accused of trespassing and other crimes.We are available 24/7 to assist you with your case. Contact us today at (407) 377-0150 to schedule a free consultation.

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