| Read Time: 2 minutes | Criminal Defense

Avoid Being Arrested for these Common 4th of July Crimes

The Fourth of July is a time for celebration. Of course, the first Independence Day was a tumultuous time for the nation’s founders–they were literally facing treason charges from the British Crown. Fortunately, few Orlando residents will find themselves in that kind of legal trouble today. But there are other more ordinary crimes that can lead to your arrest during the extended holiday. Here are just a few things to keep in mind as you head out to your July 4th celebration this year: Minor in possession of alcohol. With schools and colleges out for the summer, many teenagers will try and take advantage of the holiday to consume beer or other alcoholic beverages with their friends. While the United States may have been founded on the principles of “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness,” that does not cover underage drinking. It is a second-degree misdemeanor in Florida for anyone under the age of 21 to possess alcohol. Driving under the influence (DUI). The Orlando area is frequently jammed with people visiting local theme parks and other attractions over the 4th of July holiday. Combined with the local celebrations–many of which involve the consumption of alcohol, legal or otherwise–this usually means a significant increase in drunk driving. For a first-time offender, a DUI can lead to up to six months in jail and a 1-year suspension of driving privileges. Breach of the peace. Section 877.03 of the Florida Statutes broadly prohibits acts that “corrupt the public morals, or outrage the sense of public decency, or affect the peace and quiet of persons who may witness them.” Generally speaking, this means it is a misdemeanor “breach of the peace” to engage in public fighting or engage in other kinds of disruptive behavior. Sometimes the broad language of the law can lead to comical results. For example, on 4th of July in 2015, Neptune Beach police arrested 22-year-old Lane Pittman for “breach of the peace” because he was playing the national anthem too loudly on a public sidewalk. Disorderly intoxication. Having a couple of drinks to celebrate the holiday is fine (assuming you’re at least 21 years old). But it is a misdemeanor under Florida law to be “intoxicated and endanger the safety of another person or property.” This is known as “disorderly intoxication,” and it also applies to cases where a person is drinking in a public place or conveyance (such as a bus or train) and causes a “disturbance.” Stay Safe This Holiday–and Call Our Dedicated Orlando Criminal Defense Attorneys if You Need Help The best way to keep out of legal trouble this Independence Day is to attend an organized public celebration. The City of Orlando will host its annual “Fireworks at the Fountain” starting at 4 p.m. The University of Florida in Gainesville will have its own Fanfares & Fireworks show at Flavet Field from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. on July 3rd. And Walt Disney World has its “Celebrate America” concerts planned for July 3 and July 4 starting at 9:15 p.m. each evening. Whatever you choose to do this 4th of July, stay safe. And if you are arrested for some reason and need advice on what to do from an experienced Orlando criminal defense lawyer, contact the offices of Moses & Rooth, Attorneys at Law, at (407) 377-0150

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Drug Charges

Signs Your Neighbor May be Involved in Manufacturing or Selling Drugs

It’s not exactly news to point out the Orlando area has a problem with drug dealers and illegal drug manufacturers. Indeed, many drug operations work inconspicuously out of residential homes. Perhaps you suspect there is a dealer or producer in your own neighborhood. Here are a few common signs, based on advice from law enforcement, that may indicate your neighbor is involved with the drug trade. There’s an unusual amount of foot traffic in and out of the house. Lots of people run (legal) small businesses out of their homes. But if you notice a large amount of people coming and going from a house, particularly at night or outside of normal business hours, that suggests there may be something fishy going on. Take note if there are a lot of strangers–i.e., people who don’t live in the neighborhood–paying quick visits, making deliveries, and exchanging small items for cash. Your neighbors appear to be financially successful despite not having jobs. If you live in a run-of-the-mill, middle-class neighborhood, it won’t escape notice if someone moves in and owns a flashy car or a big-screen television. In and of itself, this is not cause for alarm. But if your new neighbors do not appear to have jobs or any obvious source of income, that may suggest something more sinister. The house itself does not look or smell right. If you smell noxious or musty odors coming from a house, that could suggest the presence of a meth lab. Additional visual cues include blacked-out windows (even during the day) and unusually high fences or similar security measures that seem out of place for the neighborhood. You notice drug paraphernalia in the area. Drug dealers–and their customers–are not always neat. If you find syringes or small plastic bags littering the area, that’s a good indication there’s at least drug use in the area. Also take note if there are a high number of chemical containers in your neighbor’s trash, such as paint thinner, antifreeze, and drain cleaner. All of these items are used in the production of meth. Should I Call the Police? Of course, suspicion is not evidence. And many people are understandably reluctant to contact the police based on nothing more than a hunch and some unusual activity. So what should you do if you suspect drug activity? One step you can take is to check and see if your neighbors have a criminal record. Arrests and convictions are a matter of public record. And there are a number of online services that allow you to conduct a more comprehensive criminal background check. But above all else, never attempt to confront someone if you suspect they are manufacturing or selling drugs. If you honestly believe there is a problem, you should contact the local police or sheriff’s office and let them look into it. Do not take the law into your own hands. Have You Been Falsely Accused of Making or Selling Drugs? On the other side of the fence, many Orlando-area residents find themselves the target of false and unsubstantiated drug charges. If you are arrested and charged with possession or distribution, you need to contact an experienced Orlando criminal defense lawyer as soon as possible. Contact the offices of Moses & Rooth, Attorneys at Law, at (407) 377-0150, to schedule a consultation with a member of our team today.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Domestic Violence

Why Domestic Violence First Responders and Florida Gun Laws Clash

For Orlando-area police officers, domestic violence calls are among the most dangerous situations they face. What starts out as a verbal argument between two people quickly escalates into threats of physical violence. And when one of the parties has a gun, these threats may turn into deadly action–exposing not only the other person but any law enforcement first responders who arrive at the scene. Post-Stoneman Douglas Laws Will Likely Affect Domestic Violence Cases Domestic violence is usually not a one-time occurrence. Police often find themselves responding to multiple calls from the same household over a period of weeks or months. This can significantly elevate the risk to law enforcement, as they know they are responding to a decaying domestic situation with a growing potential for violence. For police, the key to ensuring a safe resolution is restricting the availability of firearms to the people inside the house–especially if one of the occupants has a documented history of domestic violence. Historically, this was easier said than done, as the victim had to first obtain an order of protection against domestic violence. Such orders typically require the subject to surrender any firearms he or she owns to the police. But in the aftermath of the Stoneman Douglas High School mass murder on February 14, the Florida legislature passed new legislation designed to further restrict access to firearms by individuals who are judged to be a risk to the public. Under the new law, signed by Gov. Rick Scott on March 9, a law enforcement officer may directly petition a Florida circuit court judge for a “risk protection order” against any individual who “poses a significant danger of causing personal injury to himself or herself or others by having a firearm or any ammunition in his or her custody or control.” Once the officer files the petition, the court must hold a hearing within 14 days. In the interim, the judge can issue a temporary “ex parte” order immediately suspending the subject’s right to own or possess firearms. Following the hearing, the court can issue a final risk protection order if the state demonstrates by “clear and convincing evidence” that the subject does in fact pose a danger to the community. Note this standard is less rigorous than the “beyond a reasonable doubt” standard used in criminal cases, but more stringent than the civil standard of “preponderance of the evidence.” An Orlando Criminal Defense Lawyer Will Make Sure the Courts Respect Your Rights While Florida legislators acted in response to a horrific school shooting, the availability of risk protection orders will also prove beneficial to police looking to confront individuals suspected of domestic violence. A risk protection order does not require any action on the part of an accuser or victim, since law enforcement may now directly apply for an order to disarm someone deemed a threat to themselves or others. At the same time, this may open the judicial system to abuses, as individuals subject to risk protection orders may not receive adequate due process before their rights are restricted. This is why it is always a good idea to work with an experienced Orlando domestic violence attorney who understands the law in this area and can advise you on how to best assert your rights in court. Contact the offices of Moses & Rooth, Attorneys at Law, at (407) 377-0150, to schedule a consultation with a member of our team today.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | DUI

State of Florida Launches $5M Ad Campaign to Warn Against “Driving Baked”

Although marijuana has gained greater social acceptance in recent years–particularly as a medicinal drug–it remains a dangerous controlled substance under federal and state law. And while Florida voters approved the limited manufacture and use of medicinal cannabis as part of a statewide constitutional amendment, that does not mean you can simply smoke a joint in public whenever you feel like it. To the contrary, it remains illegal to smoke marijuana in public–or to drive a car while under the influence of any cannabis-containing product. Raising Awareness of Impaired Driving Laws “Driving baked” may not get as much attention as traditional drunk driving. But according to Florida law, a person is just as guilty of a DUI if they are under the influence of a “controlled substance…when affected to the extent that a person’s normal faculties are impaired.” This means that you can be charged with DUI if police officers have proof that you are “driving baked” or even simply impaired because you took too much cold medicine. As part of the implementation of the medical cannabis constitutional amendment, the Florida Legislature directed the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles to implement a “statewide impaired driving education campaign to raise awareness and prevent marijuana-related and cannabis-related impaired driving.” The Legislature set aside $5 million in Florida’s 2018 budget specifically for this education campaign. The campaign itself includes conducting surveys to evaluate “awareness” of Florida laws related to impaired driving, as well as traditional mass-media advertising. With respect to the latter, the Department released its first television ad in April 2018. The 30-second commercial, narrated by a Florida Highway Patrol trooper, reminds drivers to think about their fellow passengers, other motorists, and bicyclists before getting behind the wheel while impaired. The ad ends with the Trooper warning drivers, “You’ll answer to us. Drive baked, get busted.” According to a January 2018 report prepared in connection with the launch of the campaign, the priority for these ads is to “make clear and direct links to the negative consequences for marijuana-impaired driving in a memorable and conversational way to create true behavior change.” The report noted the target audience for the ads includes younger drivers between the ages of 18-34. The Department also plans to conduct follow-up surveys beginning in July to assess overall statewide awareness of impaired driving laws as they relate to marijuana and cannabis. Get Help with a Drug-Related DUI Charge in Orlando Drug-impaired driving cases are often much more complicated than traditional DUI, since law enforcement cannot simply rely on a breath-analysis to determine impairment. So if you are pulled over by a DHP trooper or an Orlando police officer on suspicion of driving under the influence of a controlled substance, remember you have the right to remain silent and speak with a qualified Orlando criminal defense lawyer. Call Moses & Rooth, Attorneys at Law, at (407) 377-0150 to speak with a DUI lawyer today.  

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Drug Charges

What Is Drug Addiction?

Our society has been conditioned to think of drug addiction as a legal problem. Every year thousands of people in Florida and throughout the United States are charged with drug crimes ranging from possession of banned substances to prescription drug fraud. But in our political rush to judge and condemn drug users, we often forget they are suffering from a serious mental health disorder–namely, drug addiction. Drug Addiction Is a Brain Disease, Not a Lack of “Willpower” Obviously, drug addiction covers a wide variety of substances. Some are legal, such as alcohol or nicotine, while others are classified as “controlled substances” like cocaine and heroin. But whatever the drug involved, addiction manifests itself in the same way. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), addiction is “a chronic, relapsing brain disease that is characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use, despite harmful consequences.” The critical thing to understand here is that addiction is a disease. It is not a reflection of the victim’s willpower or personal ethics. Many people with no criminal backgrounds or history of violent behavior become drug addicts. Yet there is still a strong social stigma attached to drug addiction because many addicts initially take drugs “to feel good.” It is true that many drugs–especially stimulants such as cocaine–produce euphoria and a sense of relaxation in the user. But the problem is that addiction slowly alters the brain chemistry of the user, to the point where they become unable to function without a steady supply of the drug. It is then no longer a question of taking the drug to feel good–it is now a matter of avoiding the pain of withdrawal if the brain’s addiction is not fed. This leads many people to take any steps necessary to obtain a “fix,” without regard to the potential consequences for themselves and their loved ones. So even when an addiction started out as a voluntary behavior, at a certain point the addict may objective lose self-control and routinely engage in self-destructive behavior. Are You at Greater Risk for Drug Addiction–and Possible Legal Problems? Not everyone who uses alcohol or drugs will develop an addiction. Indeed, there is no 100 percent reliable way to know in advance who will (or won’t) become an addict. But public health professionals and scientists have identified a number of risk factors that increase a person’s chances of becoming an addict. According to the NIDA, many of these factors are social rather than biological. For instance, children who are exposed to drugs from an early age at school or in the home are at greater risk for addiction. Similarly, a child who grows up in poverty or lacking parental supervision may turn to drugs to cope with their situation. Unfortunately, by the time a young person develops a drug addiction, they may already find themselves in trouble with the law. Drug possession is still a crime under federal and state law regardless of the defendant’s mental health status. That is why it is important to work with a qualified Orlando criminal defense attorney if you are facing any kind of drug charge. Contact Moses & Rooth, Attorneys at Law, at (407) 377-0150 today.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Domestic Violence

When Domestic Abuse Victims are too Afraid to Speak Up

If you ask the typical Orlando-area police officer what scenario they fear most while on-duty, their answer probably will not be “taking down a drug dealer” or responding to a mass shooting. Instead, the officer may tell you their greatest fear is responding to a domestic violence call. And with good reason: According to the FBI, 136 police officers lost their lives between 1988 and 2016 while handling domestic violence matters. This makes domestic violence the single largest category of firearm-related fatalities for law enforcement nationwide. Victims Face Credibility Catch-22 Of course, domestic violence is even more devastating to its victims. And in many cases, victims never bother to contact the police in the first place. A recent report published by USA Today sheds some light on the reasons why. The report cited a 2015 survey by the National Domestic Violence Hotline where about 25 percent of respondents said that while they previously reported acts of domestic violence, they would not contact the police again, mostly out of fear they would not be believed. And more comprehensive statistics gathered by the U.S. Department of Justice suggest more than half of “non-fatal domestic violence” incidents are never reported to police at all. Many domestic violence victims feel they are in a Catch-22 situation. If they call the police right away, they are afraid that officers will not believe their story. But if they later change their mind and contact law enforcement, their delay in seeking assistance may be used as proof their allegations lack credibility. And for many domestic abuse victims–especially in Florida–there is a secondary fear that going to the police might place them at risk for arrest or even deportation. There are approximately 110,000 unauthorized immigrants living in the Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford metropolitan area, according to a 2017 report from the Pew Research Center. Given the recent focus at the federal level on “cracking down” on undocumented immigrants, many domestic violence victims who might be subject to such a crackdown are understandably reluctant to step forward for fear of losing their jobs, home, and families. Domestic Violence & Deportation It should be noted that despite the political fervor surrounding undocumented immigrants, it is still not okay to commit acts of domestic violence against anyone based on their legal residency status. As U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services itself has made clear, “Under all circumstances, domestic violence, sexual assault and child abuse are illegal in the United States,” and every victim–regardless of immigration status–is protected from such acts under law. But on the flip side, if you are a non-citizen convicted of domestic violence–even if you have a visa or green card–you are subject to deportation at any time following said conviction. This means that if you have been falsely accused of domestic violence, it is critical to defend yourself in court. If you need advice or assistance from a qualified Orlando domestic violence attorney, contact Moses & Rooth, Attorneys at Law, today at (407) 377-0150.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Drunk Driving

When Did the First DUI Charge Occur in the United States?

Drunk driving has been around as long as there have been cars. In the early morning hours of September 10, 1897, a 25-year-old London taxi cab driver named George Smith was charged by local police with “being drunk when in charge of a motor car.” A constable observed Smith operating a “four-wheeled electric cab,” when he suddenly “swerved from one side of the road to the other, and ran across the footway into 165, New Bond-street, breaking the water-pipe and the beading of the window,” according to a contemporary report in the London Morning Post. A Brief History of DUI Laws As far as anyone knows, Smith was the first person ever charged with a DUI in any country. But it would take another 13 years before the first DUI laws were adopted in the United States. In 1910, the New York legislature became the first to prohibit “driving while intoxicated.” It is not clear who the first person charged under that law was. Keep in mind, in 1910 it was not possible for police officers to chemically test the alcohol content of a driver’s blood. And even if such a test existed, the original DUI laws did not establish a specific threshold for intoxication. It was therefore left to the discretion of individual officers to determine when a DUI charge was warranted. It was not until 1936 that the forerunner of the modern Breathalyzer–known as the “Drunkometer”–was patented by Dr. Rolla N. Harger, a professor of biochemistry at Indiana University. Two years later, in 1938, Harger was part of a National Safety Council committee that, together with the American Medical Association, recommended states adopt a 0.15 percent blood-alcohol content (BAC) as the standard for DUI. Most states quickly followed this advice. But by the 1980s, there was increased public and media attention paid to DUI accidents. Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD), which formed in 1980, pushed for the adoption of a stricter DWI standard of 0.08 percent. Today all states have a 0.08 standard for drunk drivers over the age of 21. And many states, including Florida, have a “zero-tolerance” standard for drivers under the age of 21, meaning they can be charged with DUI if their BAC is as low as 0.02 percent. Taking Drunk Driving Seriously in Florida Despite more than a century of data regarding the harms of drunk driving, alcohol impairment remains a significant cause of accidents and fatalities in Florida. According to a 2015 fact sheet published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 8,500 people were killed “in crashes involving a drunk driver” in Florida between 2003 and 2012. Indeed, Florida’s drunk-driving death rate is about 12 percent higher than the national average for that same period. This is why Orlando-area law enforcement and prosecutors take drunk driving cases extremely seriously. If you are charged with a DUI, even for the first time, do not assume the law will go easy on you. It is imperative you work with a qualified Orlando drunk driving defense lawyer. Contact Moses & Rooth, Attorneys at Law, at (407) 377-0150 if you need to speak with a lawyer today.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Criminal Defense

Tennessee Double-Murder Suspect Found Dead After Confessing Crimes on Facebook

Many Florida residents are accustomed to sharing their daily activities with friends via Facebook and other social media networks. But the darker side of this phenomenon was on display recently when a 22-year-old Tennessee man took to his Facebook page to confess to the murder of two people, including his own mother, shortly before taking his own life. According to an April 9 report in USA Today, the man published his post the day before. In it, he said that around 5 a.m. that morning, “I shot and killed my mother … and a close friend of mine … with a stolen .22 [long rifle].” He went on to describe the crimes in graphic detail, noting he killed one of the victims while he was sleeping and that he shot his mother “several times until she died.” The man went onto say in his post that, “I take full responsibility for my actions. Nothing anyone has or hasn’t done to me caused this, my decisions and my failures are my own.” He said that he did not “want or need forgiveness from anyone,” and that anyone who wanted to help should direct their efforts towards his older brother, who he said “will probably need a lot of help getting through this.” Police spent nearly a day looking for the man following his online confession. His body was ultimately located in Jasper County, Mississippi. According to the local sheriff, the man shot himself about 100 yards from his vehicle, which was abandoned somewhere on Interstate 59 in the unincorporated community of Vossburg. The man’s older brother did speak with the press. He said that he received a text message indicating that his younger brother had sent him $250 for what were described as “Damages.” The older brother assumed from this cryptic message that his older brother had committed suicide. Only later did he learn about the murders. According to the Washington Post, the older brother said he was an advocate of gun control, and that his younger brother actually shares his anti-gun views. The older brother speculated that his sibling, who attempted to kill himself at least twice before these events, was simply determined not to fail a third time. The older brother noted his younger brother had suffered “from severe depression and had stayed briefly at mental-health facilities,” but he had no prior history of criminal behavior. Indeed, the older brother told the press, “No one ever said [his younger brother] was a harm to anybody else. No mental-health professional ever indicated any of that.” Getting Help for Family Members in Mental Health or Legal Trouble Obviously, this tragic story comes on the heels of the recent mass murder in Parkland, Florida, where the accused shooter’s mental state–and access to firearms–has been the subject of much public and political debate. But as the Tennessee man’s subsequent self-inflicted gunshot wound illustrates, the majority of gun deaths in the U.S. are suicides rather than homicides. If you have a family member who is contemplating taking their own life, please encourage them to seek professional help or contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. And if you have reason to believe they may be involved in a criminal act arising from their mental health condition, seek legal advice by contacting the Orlando criminal defense attorneys at Moses & Rooth or calling 407) 377-0150 right away.

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| Read Time: 3 minutes | DUI

Traveling with a DUI Conviction on Your Record

A DUI conviction can affect your life in many ways. It can cause you to lose your driver’s license and spend time in jail. Even if you avoid jail time, you may be placed on probation. You may also have to pay a fine and be ordered to take alcohol education classes. In addition, you may lose your job, and your DUI conviction may even affect your relationship with friends and family members. One thing you might not have considered, however, is how a DUI conviction might affect your travel plans. If you engage in frequent foreign travel, a DUI could put a wrench in your next vacation. This is certainly something to think about before booking a ticket across the border. Not all countries treat a DUI conviction the same. Some don’t care. Some are very strict. Some are in between and treat crimes on a case-by-case basis. In any case, if you’re planning to leave the country in the near future, it’s a good idea to know which countries you can travel to and which ones you’ll have to avoid. To be sure, according to USA Today, the following is a short list of the countries that treat foreign DUIs in various ways; of course, the limitations may depend on the visa regime of the country, as well, and whether or not you need to apply for a visa beforehand or can simply travel to the country with only your passport. Ultimately, it also is important to remember that international law may be constantly changing or applied differently than at home. As such, don’t hesitate to reach out to a local lawyer for more information. Mexico Mexico’s immigration laws are strict on those who have committed certain crimes. The country considers a DUI a felony offense. Indeed, if you have been convicted of a DUI within the past 10 years, you may not be allowed to enter Mexico pursuant to the law. Canada Our neighbor to the north is notorious for being strict with DUIs. Driving while under the influence of drugs or alcohol is considered a felony there, so if you have been convicted of a DUI at home, you may not be able to enter the country. However, there are some exceptions. If you were convicted of a DUI but never spent time in jail and have an otherwise clean record, you may be able to get around the ban for a $200 fine. Also, you can enter Canada once it’s been 10 years since your DUI conviction if the crime has been expunged from your record. However, note that if your DUI has been diverted or deferred, you may not be able to enter Canada until you complete the program. New Zealand If you have been convicted of a DUI, you likely will still be able to travel to New Zealand unless the charges were serious. For example, if you served a prison sentence of five years or longer or served a sentence of 12 months or longer in the past 10 months, then you may face difficulties getting into the country. China/Japan/Malaysia These countries often ask about misdemeanor charges and will likely run background checks in order to obtain more information. Dubai/Persian Gulf DUI convictions are not necessarily condemned, but alcohol-related crimes are looked at negatively, especially within the country. Entry may be on a case-by-case basis. Contact an Orlando Attorney for More Information As is now clear, a DUI conviction in Florida can even affect your ability to travel. This can ruin your future vacation plans, especially if you have friends or family members you want to visit in a specific country. This is why if you are ever pulled over for suspected DUI in Orlando, you should seek legal help right away. Contact the aggressive Orlando, Florida criminal defense lawyers at Moses & Rooth. We can assess the situation and reduce your charges. We might even be able to have your DUI charge dropped altogether. Schedule a consultation with our office today by calling (407) 377-0150. You can also contact us online.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Domestic Violence

Recognizing the Signs of an Abusive Relationship

Many relationships are based on love and trust. The two parties involved respect each other enough to not physically or emotionally hurt one another. They do not forcefully push, shove or hit each other, and they do not use or threaten any other type of violence. Some relationships, however, become violent. While men are often the ones accused of domestic violence, women can be abusive, as well. Ultimately, the abuser should be able to control his or her behavior. It’s not the other person’s fault that the abuser physically or emotionally abuses the victim. An abusive relationship is not healthy. However, victims are often afraid to leave the relationship because they fear the abuser will stalk them, hurt them even more or even kill them. Signs to Look For Do you think you or a loved one is in an abusive relationship? There are many signs to look for.  First, analyze your feelings and answer these questions: Do you avoid talking about certain topics because you don’t want to anger your partner? Are you scared of your partner? Do you feel as though you can’t do anything right? Do you feel helpless? Do you feel like you deserve to be mistreated by your partner? Now, think about your partner’s behavior. Does he or she do any of the following? Yell at you Humiliate you Criticize you Treat you in such a cruel manner that you don’t want your loved ones to see Blame you for his or her abusive behavior Belittle your accomplishments Treat you as a sex object Many abusive people resort to threats and violent behavior. Does your partner do any of the following? Hurt you Threaten to kill you Threaten your children Threaten to commit suicide if you leave Destroy your personal property Force you to have sex Many abusive people want to have control of their partners. Does your partner control you in these ways? Act abnormally possessive or jealous Keep you from seeing friends or family Limit your access to certain items, such as your phone, car or money Need to know where you are at all times Constantly check up on you If you answered yes to many of the questions above, you are in an abusive relationship and should seek help right away. Ask a trusted friend or family member to help you. You can seek help in your community. Contact the authorities and get a restraining order. Get Help for Your Criminal Case in Orlando In a domestic violence case, it’s important to understand both sides of the story. Sometimes physical violence occurs accidentally or in self-defense. Sometimes “victims” make up their stories during divorce cases or as acts of revenge. If you are accused of domestic violence, you need someone on your side to help. Contact the aggressive Orlando criminal defense lawyers at Moses & Rooth. We will assess your case and help you achieve the best outcome possible. Call our office at (407) 377-0150 or contact us online to schedule your free consultation today.

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