| Read Time: 2 minutes | Traffic Offenses

Habitual Traffic Offender Status Can Now be Removed and Overturned

It’s 2019, don’t you think it’s time to get your license back? Start the year off right. Public transportation in Florida is just not good enough. Having a valid driver’s license is a must, so listen up if you received a Habitual Traffic Offender notice. The Florida Supreme Court issued changes to the Florida Rules of Traffic Court starting January 1, 2019. These Traffic Court changes make the process and legal arguments for removal of a habitual offender status (HTO) much easier. If the Florida Department of Highway Safety Motor Vehicles labels you as a Habitual Traffic Offender, you will have a driver’s license suspension for 5 years. How Habitual Traffic Offender is Defined Florida Statute 322.264 defines Habitual Traffic Offender (3-strike rule) as any person who has accumulated three or more or the following offenses: Voluntary or involuntary Manslaughter Any Driving Under the Influence charge Any Felony in the commission of which a motor vehicle is used Driving While License Suspended Failure to stop and render aid as required by law in the event of a motor vehicle crash Driving a commercial vehicle when not qualified ****15 convictions for moving traffic offenses for which points may be assessed may also result in Habitual Status The most common reason for issuance of a Habitual Traffic Offender Suspension is 3 convictions of driving on a suspended license. It does not matter if the DWLS (driving while license suspended) was with OR without knowledge. Prior to January 1, 2019, the Florida Rules of Traffic Court only allowed for a reduction in penalty for traffic court within 60 days. Florida Traffic Court Rule 6.490 Correction and Reduction of Penalty was changed on January 1, 2019 to include: Correction of Penalty. An official may at any time correct an illegal penalty. Reduction of Penalty. An official may reduce a legal penalty: Within 60 days after its imposition, or thereafter with good cause shown State of Florida v. Brandi Vessels, 26 Fla Fla. L. Weekly Supp. 868 (Fla. 18th Cir Ct. 2018) Challenging a Habitual Traffic Offender Conviction Attacking the conviction for a Civil Driving on a suspended License without knowledge can now legally be challenged after the 60 day time limit that was previously restricting some courts from making a modification. Good cause must be detailed and explained to the court for consideration. So, if you have 3 driving on a suspended license without knowledge convictions within a 5 year period, a motion must be filed with the court to overturn the conviction and change the sentence (withhold of adjudication). Once this is accomplished the order for the court must direct the clerk to notify the DMV of the sentencing change in order for the habitual traffic offender status to be removed. If you have a HTO suspension, call us at 407-377-0150. We may be able to have that suspension overturned.

Continue Reading

| Read Time: 2 minutes | Traffic Offenses

New Laws Proposed for Skateboarders and Bicyclists in Orlando

In Florida, the rules of the road are not just about cars and other motor vehicles. Even bicyclists and skateboarders must follow the law when they’re out and about on public streets. In cities like Orlando, it is currently illegal to ride a bicycle or skateboard on a public sidewalk. But the Orlando City Council recently considering adoption of a new local ordinance that would change those rules. Skateboarding May Be a Permitted Mode of “Transportation” on Sidewalks At its September 17 meeting, the Council voted unanimously to endorse Ordinance No. 2018-56, which rewrites local traffic rules with respect to bicycles and skateboards. The ordinance’s introductory language states that opening Orlando’s sidewalks to skateboards and bicycles is consistent with the Council’s long-term plan to ensure that a “majority of all trips in the City are made by foot, bike, carpooling, or transit,” and that “properly regulated, skateboarding and bicycle sharing services offer a viable, healthy, and environmentally sustainable transportation option.” To be clear, with respect to skateboarding the ordinance is designed to encourage the use of such devices for transportation only. It does not cover individuals who use their boards to perform “tricks, jumps, gymnastics, grinding, or other physical feats unnecessary to the efficient conveyance or movement of the person from one location to another.” Within these parameters, the ordinance permits skateboarders to use the sidewalk, provided they yield the right-of-way to pedestrians and give an “audible signal before overtaking and passing a pedestrian.” The ordinance would further restrict the speed of motorized skateboards on sidewalks to no more than 15 miles per hour. And any skateboarder under the age of 16 must wear a helmet “that is properly fitted” and fastened to their head by a strap. Failure to follow any of these rules may result in a fine. Expanding Bike Sharing Opportunities Ordinance 2018-56 would also create new rules to permit “bike sharing” companies in Orlando. According to Spectrum News 13, only one such company is presently allowed to operate in the city. Bike share companies allow individuals to rent bicycles, typically via a smartphone app, for short periods of time. Under existing city regulations, the bike share company must provide “docks” for their rental bikes. But the new ordinance would authorize “dockless” services–in other words, the renter can simply abandon the bike once they are done using it. The new bike share rules would require any company to obtain a permit annually from the city and meet certain insurance, bonding, and reporting requirements. Have You Been Charged with a Traffic Offense? We Can Help The City Council must still pass Ordinance 2018-56 a second time at its October 8 meeting. But assuming the new rules do take effect, it will be good news for skateboarders and bicyclists throughout the city. Of course, with new rights comes new responsibilities. And if you are cited for a traffic offense related to the use of any vehicle on a public street or sidewalk and need legal advice, contact the experienced Orlando criminal defense lawyers at Moses & Rooth today by calling (407) 377-0150.

Continue Reading

| Read Time: 2 minutes | Drunk Driving

Florida’s Zero Tolerance for Underage DUI

Drunk drivers cause considerable damage on Florida’s roads. According to the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, over 5,000 crashes were caused by drunk drivers in 2016. These wrecks caused 461 deaths and over 3,000 injuries—staggering numbers that cost the state millions of dollars a year. Because those under 21 cannot legally consume alcohol, Florida unsurprisingly has a zero tolerance policy for underage DUI. If you or a loved one has been picked up for driving while intoxicated, you need to hire an experienced criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. Legal Limit Under Florida law, drivers must have a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) under 0.08. If your BAC is higher, then you have committed a DUI. Drivers under 21 have an even lower maximum BAC: any score of 0.02 or higher qualifies. This means that a single drink can render a young driver legally intoxicated. Punishments are serious for those who are under 21: You will lose your license for six months in an administrative suspension if this is your first offense. If it is a second offense, then you will lose your license for a year. If you refused to take a roadside test, your license will be suspended for a year. If this is your second or subsequent refusal, your license will be suspended for 18 months. If your BAC was 0.08% or higher, then you will receive the same punishments as an adult would. You can pay a fine of $500-1,000, have your license suspended for 180 days to 1 year, perform 50 hours of community service, and spend up to 6 months in county jail. The state can also impound your vehicle. If you were picked up for DUI and are under the age of 18, then you will lose your license for six months and must undergo a mandatory evaluation or complete an alcohol education program. Collateral Consequences of a DUI Conviction Losing your license for 6 months and doing some community service might not sound like stiff punishments. You might even get your parents to pay your fine for you. However, criminal convictions have repercussions that can last a long time and can make it hard for young adults to establish themselves. With a criminal record, you might experience the following: It can be harder to get an apartment It might be harder to obtain a job Your preferred college or university might reject you You might not qualify for scholarships You might not gain acceptance into the military For these reasons, you must take any arrest for under-21 DUI very seriously. At Moses & Rooth, we can review the circumstances surrounding your arrest and identify your strongest defense. Charged with an Under-21 DUI in Orlando? DUI is no laughing matter. The costs can be considerable and long-lasting. By contacting one of our Orlando DUI attorneys, you can give yourself the best chance of a favorable outcome, whether that involves a generous plea deal or fighting your charges in court. To learn more about how we can help you, please call 407-377-0150 to schedule your free consultation.

Continue Reading

| Read Time: 2 minutes | Traffic Offenses

Common Driving Mistakes That Lead to Traffic Stops

When you think of traffic stops, speeding probably comes to mind—and for good reason. Going too fast accounts for 34 million speeding tickets every year in the United States. Speeding is a leading cause of accidents. For every 100 speeding tickets, there are 5.6 fewer injuries and 14.3 fewer crashes. But there are other reasons why police officers make traffic stops. Some of these are probably things you do every time you drive. All of these mistakes can be easily avoided, so the next time you get in your case, use some common sense and avoid getting pulled over. Not Using Turn Signals The lights on your car are there for a reason. Turn signals communicate your intentions to other drivers. If you don’t use them and end up in an accident, you could be at fault. If a police officer sees you trying to make a turn without using your turn signals, you could be pulled over. So be polite and use them. Improper Lane Changes If you need to change lanes in order to get off the freeway or move away from a semi truck, then you can certainly do so if it is safe. However, too many lane changes in a short amount of time will get you noticed by a police officer—and not in a good way. if you’re acting like you’re in a race, you are being reckless and could get pulled over. Tailgating Tailgating happens quite often, especially when a driver is stuck behind a slower vehicle and is experiencing road rage. But that doesn’t make it right. A tailgater can get pulled over and cited. Tailgating can lead to a life-threatening rear-end accident, which would be your fault. The car in front of you can stop at any time, so keep some distance if you want to protect your driving record, your car and your life. Distracted Driving When you’re driving, you need to be focusing on the road in front of you. However, many drivers are trying to multitask when behind the wheel. They may be texting, eating, reading, applying makeup or dealing with rowdy kids. Distracted driving is common among teens. Forty percent of teens have been a passenger in a vehicle where the driver was on their phone. This is a dangerous practice that often leads to fatal accidents. If a police officer sees you looking in another direction besides straight ahead, you could be pulled over. Contact an Orlando Criminal Defense Attorney Something as innocent as a traffic stop can lead to an arrest, jail time and fines. It’s important to understand your rights if you are ever pulled over. Police officers have to follow a set of rules and procedures after pulling you over. If you are arrested at a traffic stop, it’s important that you discuss the incident with an Orlando criminal defense lawyer right away. At Moses & Rooth Attorneys at Law, we will aggressively fight to protect your rights. We can find evidence to get your charges dropped. Contact our offices today at (407) 377-0150 to see how we can help.

Continue Reading

| Read Time: 2 minutes | Traffic Offenses

Traffic Violations and Tourists

Florida is a prime tourism state. In 2016, more than 112 million people visited the state. Gorgeous beaches, theme parks, top-notch golfing and nightlife bring people from all over the world to Florida. With so many people coming into the state, odds are that many are going to get in trouble with the law. They may not cause felony crimes, but they can still be penalized for infractions such as traffic violations. Getting a traffic ticket while out of state can present some difficulties. How do you pay fines? Do you have to go to court? Dealing with an Out-of-State Ticket Under the Non-Resident Violator Compact, a speeding ticket in Florida will still affect you in your home state. This compact allows the Florida Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) to exchange information with other states—particularly your home state. This means that your home state will know if you have received a traffic ticket or were charged with a crime in another state. The DMV will then apply your home state’s laws to the offense, so it will be like you got the ticket in your home state. This means that you cannot simply ignore the ticket and refuse to pay it. The National Driver Register tracks the records of all drivers in the United States. This database can tell your state DMV whether or not you are licensed or eligible to receive a license. This information may be based off of unpaid traffic tickets from other states. Therefore, if you have not yet paid your traffic fine from your trip to Florida, you will not be able to renew your California driver’s license. Do not let this happen. Ignoring the traffic violation will only make things worse. You could face even bigger fines and even get your license suspended. Be sure to follow the rules in your state. You may also eligible for traffic school. This will hide the ticket from your record and deem you not guilty. You will not get points on your license and your insurance rates will not go up. Check with the DMV in your home state to see if you are eligible. If a traffic violation led to an arrest, however, you should seek legal representation. Each state is different when it comes to laws and a criminal defense lawyer can help you understand your rights under Florida law. Do not try to handle an out-of-state crime on your own. Contact a Criminal Defense Attorney for Help When you travel to another state for business or pleasure, anything can happen. Because you’re not familiar with the roadways, a speeding ticket or other traffic ticket is a real possibility. You need experienced legal counsel to help you with these situations. At the offices of Moses & Rooth, Attorneys at Law, our Orlando traffic violation attorneys have the experience to defend you in your DUI cases. Let us help you reduce your penalties or get your charges dropped altogether. Contact us today at (407) 377-0150 to schedule a free consultation.

Continue Reading

| Read Time: 3 minutes | Traffic Offenses

The How’s and Why’s of Driving on a Suspended License

Having a driver’s license is a privilege, not a right. That means that the government can take it away from you and it happens more than you might realize. In Florida there are 2.2 million people with a suspended or revoked driver’s license, and many of those people drive anyway. Some never had a license and others license was suspended for one reason or another. So what can happen if you are caught driving while your license is suspended? Well, some of that depends upon whether or not you knew or should have known that it was in fact suspended. A person who is driving and their license was suspended without their knowledge would only be guilty of a civil infraction (think speeding ticket). The penalty associated with this type of infraction is monetary. However, it can result in a dismissal if a valid driver’s license is obtained and presented to the clerk. Remember if you do receive this type of civil citation, it may still be a good idea to retain an attorney to ensure that either the case is dismissed OR a withhold of adjudication is entered. If the court or the clerk’s office enters an adjudication of guilt it could potentially subject you to habitual traffic offender status. If you are caught driving on a suspended license and you knew or should have know that that your license was suspended (driving while license suspended with knowledge) you are looking at a criminal offense. The potential penalties for a driving on a suspended license (dwls) will vary depending on if this is a first time offense or if it has occurred more often. A first DWLS is a second degree misdemeanor and it is punishable by up to 60 days in jail, up to six months of probation, and up to a $500 fine. A second DWLS is classified as a first degree misdemeanor which is punishable by up to a year in jail, up to one year of probation, and up to a $1000.00 fine. A third DWLS is a third degree felony. A third degree felony is punishable by up to 5 years in the department of corrections, up to five years of probation and a $5000.00. CHARGE CIVIL or CRIMINAL FINE JAIL/ PRISON PROBATION DRIVING ON A SUSPEND LICENSE WITHOUT KNOWLEDGE Florida Statute 322.34(1) CIVIL $153.00 N/A N/A DRIVING ON A SUSPEND LICENSE WITH KNOWLEDGE 1ST OFFENSE Florida Statute 322.34(2)(a) CRIMINAL MAXIMUM $500.00 UP TO 60 DAYS UP TO 6 MONTHS DRIVING ON A SUSPENDED LICENSE WITH KNOWLEDGE 2ND OFFENSE Florida Statute 322.34(2)(b) CRIMINAL MAXIMUM $1000.00 UP TO 1 YEAR UP TO ONE YEAR DRIVING ON A SUSPENDED LICENSE WITH KNOWLEDGE 3RD OR SUBSEQUENT OFFENSE Florida Statute 322.34(2)(c) CRIMINAL MAXIMUM $5000.00 UP TO 5 YEARS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS UP TO 5 YEARS Obviously, avoiding a suspended license charge is beneficial. Even a civil infraction will cost you money and potentially causing you to be classified as a habitual traffic offender, which suspends your license for 5 years. So besides buying a bus pass or relying on Uber, how can you avoid driving on a suspended license? Well in Florida the dmv loves to suspend your license. Here is a very small list of actions that can result in your license being suspended: Driving under the Influence Conviction Drug Conviction Refusing to take a breath test Failing to Pay Child Support Failing to have Insurance Failure to Pay Court Fines Failing to Appear for Court Failing to Pay for a Traffic Ticket Many of the reasons for a person’s license getting suspended is due to failing to pay financial obligations. I have seen many clients or potential clients owing thousands of dollars in court fees, fines, and late fees who have an incredibly difficult time trying to get their license back. Some Judges and prosecutors are sympathetic, while others don’t seem to care why you are driving or why your license is suspended. It is also important to note that the reason your license is suspended will greatly impact how the Judge and prosecutor will treat you. A person whose license is suspended for failing to pay a speeding ticket is treated differently than a person whose license is suspended for having a DUI. My best advice is not put yourself in that position and make sure that all of your costs, fines, and other financial obligations are taken paid. Obviously, don’t break any laws that result in a suspension of your driving privilege. However, if you do find yourself either receiving a citation or being arrested for DWLS make sure you contact an attorney who has the experience to review your driving record and assist you not only in your criminal/ civil traffic matter, but also can assist you in getting your license back in order.

Continue Reading

| Read Time: 2 minutes | Traffic Offenses

Were You Charged with Driving with a Suspended License?

If you do not live in a big city where public transportation is readily available, then you know how important it is to have a vehicle. We need our vehicles to get to and from work, to and from school, to pick up our children, and run errands. Though having the ability to drive is at an all-time high, if you have a suspended license it is in your best interest not to drive because you will hinder yourself more as well as your ability to drive. Being caught driving with a suspended license has severe consequences. It is in your best interest to seek legal representation if you have been charged with driving with a suspended license. If you or a loved one have been charged with driving with a suspended license, contact an experienced Florida criminal law attorney today to see what remedies, if any, are available to you. Legal Consequences of Driving with a Suspended License Though in some cases you may be tempted and believe it is necessary to drive while your license is suspended, it is not. In Florida, it is a criminal offense to drive while your license is suspended and depending on your case, it can either be considered a misdemeanor or a felony. In Florida, your driver’s license may be suspended for several reasons, ranging from driving while intoxicated to driving without insurance and not paying traffic tickets. Florida Statute Section 322.34 governs driving with a suspended license and states that anyone with a canceled, suspended, or revoked license can be punished, depending on the severity, up to five years in prison as well as fines up to $5,000. Though not stated in the statutes, you may also have difficulties keeping employment, obtaining insurance, as well as maintaining other daily practices if you can not drive. In some cases, you may be eligible for a provisionary license that allows a person to driver under limited conditions, such as work. However, you would need to petition the court requesting for this type of license. Not being able to drive with a suspended license is frustrating and overwhelming, however, being charged and convicted of driving with a suspended license leaves longer life impressions with worse consequences. Because of this it is in your best interest to seek legal representation and advice. Need Legal Advice? If you have been charged with driving with a suspended license then you should be aware that you face steep penalties that may affect your life financially and emotionally. Though it may seem necessary in some cases to drive with a suspended license, it is not in your best interest. If you or a loved one have been charged with driving with a suspended license seeking legal representation and advice is important. Contact Moses & Rooth Attorneys at Law at (407) 531-8694 for an initial consultation. Here, we are able to determine and seek the best possible remedies for your case. Contact our office today.

Continue Reading

| Read Time: 2 minutes | Robbery

Street Light Technician Faces Grand Theft Charges

Miami Beach law enforcement officials report that a street light technician stole $23,000 worth of city-owned copper and aluminum wire over three over years. Police authorities alleged that the technician would regularly sell the stolen wire to a Miami scrap metal business. Police investigators following Perez claim that on five occasions in November and December he cut up wire, tossed bags of it into his personal car and drove it to Federal Metal to sell it. Each load would earn the suspect between $80 and $130. When confronted at his home, police report that he confessed to the crime. The city of Miami suspended his employment two days after the arrest and are opened an investigation into the allegations. Two other technicians were also charged in connection to the theft but charges had not been filed. Defining Grand Theft In Orlando, grand theft is a special category of theft crimes known as “crimes of dishonesty.” Theft is defined by the unauthorized using or taking of another person’s property with the intent to permanently, or temporarily, divest that person of their property. Theft is either petit or grand depending on the value of property. A theft is categorized as grand theft if the property stolen totals or exceeds $300. The theft may also be categorized as grand if the property stolen is a vehicle or firearm. Degrees of Penalties  of Grand Theft Penalties for grand theft depend on the degree of the theft committed.The penalties for grand theft include: Third Degree Grand Theft: Theft of property valued between $300 – $20,000 and is punishable with up to five years in prison. Second Degree Grand Theft: Theft of property valued between $20,000 and $100,000 and is punishable with up to fifteen years in prison. First Degree Grand Theft: Theft of property valued over $100,000 and is punishable with up to thirty years in prison. Non-Legal Consequences a Grand Theft Conviction In addition to the threat of prison, a grand theft conviction could follow you for the rest of your life and make it harder to find a job or place to live. Oftentimes you will need to pass a criminal background check to obtain a job or be approved for a new home. A grand theft conviction carries a stigma that not many employers or landlords are willing to overlook. Let an Attorney Help You With Grand Theft Charges A grand theft conviction may cause others to questions your honesty. While we all know people can change, it may be hard for strangers to believe that you have changed. If you have been charged with grand theft, you will need help from an attorney to ensure you have the best defense possible. Contact Moses & Rooth, so we can discuss your charges and develop a strategy to help ensure your are not stigmatized for life. Please contact us today at 407-377-0150 to schedule an initial consultation.

Continue Reading

| Read Time: 2 minutes | Traffic Offenses

Cyclist Killed After Hit and Run

Police report that the victim, a 50-year-old transient, was hit from behind by dark colored pickup truck while riding his bike. Witnesses report that the accused stopped briefly before leaving the scene of the accident. As police investigated the crash scene, the police received a call to report a truck stopped and that “the truck appeared to have been involved in a crash and the driver was outside staggering around.” Once police arrived they found a Chevy pick up truck with damage consistent with the hit and run. Police later charged the suspect with DUI and began investigating the hit-and-run. Here is some critical information that may help you understand the context of this accident and the consequences of a hit and run accident. Understanding Hit and Run Accidents Hit and run accidents are a serious problem in Florida. The Florida Department of Highway and Motor Vehicle Safety (FLHSMV) reports that nearly 25% of car accidents in Florida are hit and run accidents and the number of fatalities caused by hit and run accidents increased 23% from 2013 to 2014. Additionally, the number of hit and run accidents statewide increased 7% in the same timeframe. Hit and run accidents are a problem for Florida law enforcement. Oftentimes hit and run accidents occur when drivers: Exceed speed limits; Drive while intoxicated; or Does not realize they have struck another person. Hit and Run Car Accidents Florida law requires a drivers to stop at the scene of the accident and provide aid to accident victims. Drivers are legally required to stop and exchange information. This, duty to give information and render aid, means you must stay at the scene of the accident and provide law enforcement officials with your name, address and registration. You may also need to provide your license if requested. Penalties for Hit and Run Accidents The penalties for a hit and run depend on the severity and circumstances of the accident: Accidents Involving Property Damage Only: failing to stop and provide information following an accident is a second degree misdemeanor charge punishable by up to 60 days in jail and a $500 fine. Accidents Involving Injury: if the accident results in injury, the penalties are more serious, failing to stop becomes a second degree felony charge punishable by up to 15 years in prison and $10,000 fine. Accidents Resulting in Death: if the accident results in death, it is a first degree felony and there is a mandatory minimum term of imprisonment of 4 years In both instances you may be required to pay restitution and a court may decide to revoke your driving privileges. Let us Help You with Hit and Run Charges Hit and run accidents are problem in Florida. As the FLHSMV statistics demonstrate, hit and run accidents cause fatalities and the number of accidents are increasing with time. If you have been accused of leaving the scene of an accident, then you will want help from an Attorney. Contact the criminal defense attorneys at Moses & Rooth, so that we can help you with the charges. Please contact us at 407-377-0150 to schedule an appointment.

Continue Reading

| Read Time: 2 minutes | Traffic Offenses

Man Faces Vehicular Homicide and Reckless Driving Charges

A Fort Lauderdale man is facing vehicular homicide and reckless driving charges after a high speed race ended in a crash killed a four year old boy. According to reports, the accused was driving a his car at 70 mph behind another car. He lost control of the car and hit a woman and two young children. Further police investigation revealed the accused was driving between 80 and 83 mph early that evening around 8 pm. The accused claims a car made a wide turn in front of the Honda. When the Honda attempted to stop, the accused was not able to stop and swerved to avoid a collision; losing control of the car. A year after the arrest prosecutors are in court moving forward with the trial. The man is facing serious charges for this incident. Reckless Driving is More than Speed Racing Many people are surprised to find that reckless driving is a criminal offense. Reckless driving is no proven by speed alone, although it can be a factor that is used in a cop determining probable cause. In order for a court to convict you of reckless driving a court must find that you were driving in a way that demonstrates your disregard for the safety of people and property. What are the Penalties for Reckless Driving The penalties for reckless driving in Florida depend on the number of previous offenses and the extent of damage to people and property. First Time Offense: a first offense in Florida with no bodily injury or property is a first degree misdemeanor with penalties of up to 90 days in jail or six months of probation, and a $500 fine. Second and Subsequent Offenses: a second offense for reckless driving is also a misdemeanor punishable with up to six months in jail and up to a $1,000 fine. The penalties for reckless driving increases when there is property damage or bodily injury. If there is serious bodily injury. Florida law upgrades the offense to a third degree felony, with penalties of up to five years in prison or five years probation, and a $5,000 fine. Vehicular Manslaughter: A Serious Reckless Driving Charge Vehicular Manslaughter, or Vehicular Homicide, is the most serious reckless driving charge because it involves the death of another human being. Vehicular manslaughter is a second degree felony punishable with up to fifteen years in prison and revocation of driving privileges. Vehicular homicide is essentially a person whose reckless driving causes the death of another Seek Help From an Attorney Speed racing and high speed chases are the stuff of movies. In real life, the impact of reckless driving can result in serious damage to property and the death of innocent bystanders. If you are facing reckless driving charges then you should contact Moses and Rooth, we understand the nuances of the criminal courts and can serve as a strong advocate for you in court. Please contact us at 407-377-0150 to schedule an appointment.

Continue Reading