| Read Time: 2 minutes | DUI

What Do I Need to Know if I Get a DUI?

Hundreds of people are arrested for drunk driving each year in the Orlando area. In Florida, driving under the influence (DUI) can lead to serious criminal and administrative penalties. With that in mind, here are a few things you need to know about how DUI laws work in Orlando. What Is Considered “Drunk Driving” in Florida? The most common definition of DUI is operating a motor vehicle with a blood-alcohol content (BAC) of 0.08 percent or higher. A person’s BAC is normally determined through the use of a Breathalyzer or similar device administered to the driver by law enforcement. But it’s important to note that BAC is not the sole method of establishing drunk driving. A person is guilty of DUI anytime their “normal faculties are impaired” while behind the wheel, which may be established by other evidence, such as testimony that the defendant was driving erratically. DUI Is Not Just About Alcohol Although we normally associate DUI with alcohol, in fact the law refers to driving under the influence of any “chemical substance” or controlled substance specified in state law. This can include anything from marijuana to nitrous oxide. Again, the key is whether or not the person was impaired due to the use of the chemical. You Can Go to Jail for DUI–Even a First Offense If you are charged, tried, and convicted of DUI for the first time in Orlando, the judge has the discretion to fine you between $500 and $1,000–as well as send you to jail for up to 6 months. Jail is not mandatory mind you, but it is a possibility. And if you are in court for your second DUI, the penalty range increases accordingly: a fine of $1,000 to $2,000 and up to 9 months in jail. There Are Additional Factors That May Enhance Your Sentence Two things that will make a DUI charge worse: Having a BAC of 0.15 percent or greater, or having a minor in the vehicle with you at the time of your arrest. Either of these factors will effectively double the range of fines listed above. Your Driver’s License Will Be Suspended The Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles is required to suspend a driver’s license for at least 180 days following a first DUI conviction. This suspension may last up to one year. And if the DUI resulted in “bodily injury” to another person, the minimum suspension period goes up to 3 years. Refusing to Take a Breathalyzer Has Consequences Florida is an “implied consent” state. This means that if Orlando police have probable cause to arrest you for DUI, it’s presumed you consent to a blood, breath, or urine test to determine your BAC. You can still refuse the test, but it will result in an automatic 1-year suspension of your driver’s license if this is your first offense. You Need to Call an Orlando DUI Defense Lawyer Although a drunk driving charge may seem like no big deal at first glance, it is a criminal matter and must be treated as such. This means you need to work with an experienced Orlando DUI defense attorney who understands the local legal system and can advise you on the appropriate steps to take. Contact Moses & Rooth, Attorneys at Law to schedule a free consultation with a member of our team today. Call (407) 377-0150.  

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Criminal Defense

Is Vaping Marijuana Legal in Florida?

Medical marijuana remains a complicated topic in Florida. As you probably know, voters approved a state constitutional amendment in 2016 to authorize the use of marijuana for medical purposes. But this doesn’t mean you can simply roll your own joint and smoke it because you think you have glaucoma. The Florida legislature adopted extensive regulations to implement the voters’ decision. Among other things, these rules specifically exclude smoking marijuana from the definition of “medical use.” Instead, individuals with a qualifying medical condition, and who receive a Medical Cannabis Card from a doctor licensed to issue one, can obtain what is known as low-THC cannabis, which is the active ingredient in marijuana. Vaping vs. Smoking So if you can’t smoke marijuana, how can you medically ingest low-THC cannabis? One approved method is vaping. But what exactly is vaping? When you smoke marijuana, you are burning the dried plant material at high temperatures to create smoke that you then inhale. Although many people think smoking pot is safer than, say, tobacco-based cigarettes, the truth is that smoking any plant-based substance releases thousands of chemical compounds, many of which are toxic to the human body. In contrast, vaping involves using an electronic device–a vaporizer–to heat the plant material (often in liquid form) at a much lower temperature. The idea is to convert the underlying material into water vapor rather than smoke. If done correctly, this water vapor contains a higher concentration of the desired chemical–in the case of medical marijuana, THC–without producing the toxic residue associated with smoking. Keep in mind, however, that while vaping may be safer than smoking, when it comes to marijuana or THC-based products, it is only legal in Florida for medical purposes. “Recreational” vaping of cannabis is still illegal. That doesn’t mean it’s not occurring. To the contrary, according to a recent CNN report, public health researchers have found cannabis vaping has become popular among some middle school and high school students. CNN cited a survey that found 1 in 11 students–12.4 percent of high schoolers and 4.5 percent of middle schoolers–had vaped marijuana at some point. One reason marijuana vaping has become more popular is that it is difficult for parents and teachers to know whether the liquid inside a vaporizer is based on nicotine or cannabis. Will It Soon Be Legal to Smoke Medical Marijuana? The legal issues surrounding medical marijuana are only going to grow more complex as the State of Florida continues to implement its regulations. Indeed, the Florida Department of Health is currently appealing a circuit court decision from Leon County that struck down the state’s ban on smoking medical marijuana. If that ruling is affirmed by the First District Court of Appeal, it could make vaping a less-attractive option for patients who would rather smoke a joint. In the meantime, if you have been charged with a drug crime related to the illegal possession or use of marijuana and need assistance from an experienced Orlando criminal defense attorney, contact Moses & Rooth right away by calling (407) 377-0150.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Traffic Offenses

New Laws Proposed for Skateboarders and Bicyclists in Orlando

In Florida, the rules of the road are not just about cars and other motor vehicles. Even bicyclists and skateboarders must follow the law when they’re out and about on public streets. In cities like Orlando, it is currently illegal to ride a bicycle or skateboard on a public sidewalk. But the Orlando City Council recently considering adoption of a new local ordinance that would change those rules. Skateboarding May Be a Permitted Mode of “Transportation” on Sidewalks At its September 17 meeting, the Council voted unanimously to endorse Ordinance No. 2018-56, which rewrites local traffic rules with respect to bicycles and skateboards. The ordinance’s introductory language states that opening Orlando’s sidewalks to skateboards and bicycles is consistent with the Council’s long-term plan to ensure that a “majority of all trips in the City are made by foot, bike, carpooling, or transit,” and that “properly regulated, skateboarding and bicycle sharing services offer a viable, healthy, and environmentally sustainable transportation option.” To be clear, with respect to skateboarding the ordinance is designed to encourage the use of such devices for transportation only. It does not cover individuals who use their boards to perform “tricks, jumps, gymnastics, grinding, or other physical feats unnecessary to the efficient conveyance or movement of the person from one location to another.” Within these parameters, the ordinance permits skateboarders to use the sidewalk, provided they yield the right-of-way to pedestrians and give an “audible signal before overtaking and passing a pedestrian.” The ordinance would further restrict the speed of motorized skateboards on sidewalks to no more than 15 miles per hour. And any skateboarder under the age of 16 must wear a helmet “that is properly fitted” and fastened to their head by a strap. Failure to follow any of these rules may result in a fine. Expanding Bike Sharing Opportunities Ordinance 2018-56 would also create new rules to permit “bike sharing” companies in Orlando. According to Spectrum News 13, only one such company is presently allowed to operate in the city. Bike share companies allow individuals to rent bicycles, typically via a smartphone app, for short periods of time. Under existing city regulations, the bike share company must provide “docks” for their rental bikes. But the new ordinance would authorize “dockless” services–in other words, the renter can simply abandon the bike once they are done using it. The new bike share rules would require any company to obtain a permit annually from the city and meet certain insurance, bonding, and reporting requirements. Have You Been Charged with a Traffic Offense? We Can Help The City Council must still pass Ordinance 2018-56 a second time at its October 8 meeting. But assuming the new rules do take effect, it will be good news for skateboarders and bicyclists throughout the city. Of course, with new rights comes new responsibilities. And if you are cited for a traffic offense related to the use of any vehicle on a public street or sidewalk and need legal advice, contact the experienced Orlando criminal defense lawyers at Moses & Rooth today by calling (407) 377-0150.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | DUI

Florida Drivers are No Longer the Worst in the Nation

We have good news for our fellow Floridians. We are no longer the worst drivers in the nation! Unfortunately, Florida drivers still rank very near the bottom of a new survey of states that graded them on the safety of their drivers. As reported by the Sun Sentinel, Florida ranked eighth in this survey—a minor improvement over the previous year, when Florida was ranked as the worst state. Although we applaud the baby steps, there is plenty of room to increase driver safety. The Study Financial website SmartAsset looked at all 50 states and graded them according to four metrics: The percentage of drivers lacking insurance The number of DUI arrests per driver The number of fatalities per mile driven The number of time state residents searched Google for speeding and traffic tickets We’re not sure these are the best metrics for ranking driver safety, but these are the ones chosen by SmartAsset. In any event, Florida’s numbers are not great—which should not surprise anyone given that we still ranked worse than 42 other states. According to Smart Asset, only 73% of Florida drivers have insurance, meaning over one quarter of our state’s motorists are on the road without insurance. Seeing that insurance is required to register a vehicle, this is surprising news. Also, Florida had around 2 DUI arrests per 1,000 drivers—again, not terrific. Florida managed to edge ahead of Mississippi, Tennessee, California, Missouri, New Mexico, and Texas in this survey—so be sure to brag the next time you visit one of those states. Massachusetts, however, ranked as the best state, with about 94% of its drivers insured. We guess they need something to be proud of given their terrible weather. What this Means for You Given the high number of uninsured vehicles, Florida motorists should make smart decisions when purchasing insurance. In particular, you should buy uninsured motorist coverage, which will kick in if an uninsured driver hits you. Throw in underinsured motorist coverage as well, which you can tap if you exhaust the insurance benefits of the driver at fault for the accident. If you do not have this coverage, then chances are you will lack sufficient resources if you get into a crash. There will be no insurance policy to cover lost wages, medical bills, property damage, and pain and suffering. Also consider buying “stackable” UM coverage, which will increase the amount of compensation available. For example, if you have three vehicles under one UM police for $25,000, you can stack them and immediately have $75,000 available in the event of a crash. Arrested for DUI? Call Us Today As a leading Florida criminal defense firm, Moses & Rooth is well acquainted with Florida’s driving under the influence laws. Our attorneys are former prosecutors who have handled countless DUI cases and can pinpoint weaknesses in the state’s case that might allow you to receive a favorable plea or beat the charges altogether. To schedule a free initial consultation with an Orlando criminal defense lawyer, please call 407-377-0150 or contact us online.  

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Criminal Defense

What are the Penalties for Vandalism?

In Florida, vandalism is called “criminal mischief” and it is covered by Florida statute 806.13. If you have been accused of criminal mischief, you will need an aggressive criminal defense attorney on your team. Penalties can be quite serious, and you will need to begin building a defense right away. Defining Criminal Mischief In Florida A person commits criminal mischief if they “willfully and maliciously” damage or injure someone else’s real or personal property. This damage can include drawing graffiti on the property. A few things jump out about this definition. The damage or injury must be willful or malicious, which basically means intentional. If you accidentally get in a car accident and slam into the side of someone’s house, you have not committed criminal mischief since you lacked the intent under the statute. You can also damage either real property (real estate) or personal property. If you harm a person, then that is a different crime (usually assault or battery). Penalties Your punishment will depend on how much damage you inflicted: If the damage is $200 or less, then you have committed a second-degree misdemeanor. If the damage is more than $200 but less than $1,000, you have committed a first-degree misdemeanor. If the damage is $1,000 or more, then you have committed a third-degree felony. If the damage interrupts the operation of a business or public services (such as the supply of water, gas, power or transportation or communication), then it is a third-degree felony regardless of the amount of damage. Jail time depends on whether you were convicted of a misdemeanor or a felony: A second-degree misdemeanor can carry up to 60 days in jail A first-degree misdemeanor might result in up to one year in jail A third-degree felony can result in up to 5 years in prison Those convicted can also be fined: A second-degree misdemeanor: up to $500 A first-degree misdemeanor: up to $1,000 A third-degree misdemeanor: up to $5,000 The amount of time you serve in jail or the amount of your fine will depend on many factors, so you should hire an Orlando criminal defense attorney to review your circumstances. Special Punishments for Graffiti The law also imposes a fine for graffiti, which depends on whether this is your first or a subsequent offense: At least $250 if this is your first offense At least $500 if this is your second offense At least $1,000 if this is your third or subsequent offense Parents will be required to pay this fine if their minor child defaced property with graffiti. Offenders will also need to perform at least 40-100 hours of community service, which can include the removal of graffiti from buildings. Speak to an Orlando Criminal Defense Attorney Criminal mischief is a serious crime that carries stiff consequences. At Moses & Rooth, we work aggressively to get a favorable outcome for our clients, which could include a dismissal, reduced charges, or an acquittal. For help building your defense, call us today at 407-377-0150. We offer a free consultation. You have no time to lose.  

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Drug Charges

What is Synthetic Marijuana?

Synthetic marijuana is made up of dry leaves or herbs, which are then impregnated with synthetic cannabinoids. In theory, synthetic marijuana should produce the same high as real marijuana by working on the same receptors in the brain. However, synthetic marijuana tends to produce different effects—anger, aggression, seizures, heart attacks, and hallucinations. There are currently around 400 varieties of synthetic marijuana. The cannabinoids are usually in powder form, which the manufacturer mixes with water to spray on leaves and herbs. And this deadly drug is killing people left and right in Florida. A Huge Problem An eye-opening report in the Miami Herald this August highlighted the prevalence of synthetic marijuana in Florida’s prisons. The total number of deaths in the state’s prisons exceeded 500 for the year, a number that would be unimaginable only a few years before. Most deaths are caused by drug overdoses, with the top killer being synthetic marijuana, also called Spice or K2. One reason synthetic marijuana is so popular in prisons is that it is not detected by current urine tests. This means that inmates who use it will avoid any discipline that they might suffer if they smoked real marijuana. Prison officials also explain that the unstructured nature of prison leaves prisoners bored and turning to drug use to fill up the day. But synthetic marijuana is a definite problem even outside jails. For example, in mid-August, over 70 people in New Haven Connecticut overdosed on synthetic marijuana in a downtown park near Yale University. No one died, though six people were near death. No Cure in Sight Synthetic marijuana is incredibly addictive, and the withdrawal symptoms for an addict are often worse than the high itself. According to the government, about 70% of inmates in prison have a substance abuse problem, but there are insufficient funds to offer treatment. In fact, the treatment programs have been slashed in Florida to help offset the state’s budget deficits, and prisoners generally garner no sympathy from the public. Currently, the federal government and states have tried to fight synthetic marijuana by banning many of the synthetic cannabinoids. New York City, for example, has recently passed laws targeting cannabinoids. Unfortunately, the target market for K2 is usually young people, who have been raised to believe that marijuana is harmless. Many people do not understand the unique dangers of the synthetic version and will use it because it is a cheap and available substitute. Dealing with Addiction If you or a loved one has used synthetic marijuana, then it is vital that you receive proper treatment. About 10% of the population will become addicted to synthetic marijuana, and the first step is to identify that you have a problem and detoxify. Young people who use the drug will have their mental development impaired, so concerned family members should not try to detoxify their children on their own. Instead, seek out a drug treatment facility for help and information. Legal Experience You Can Trust Moses & Rooth is one of the leading criminal defense law firms in Florida. We handle a variety of state and federal crimes, including drug crimes. If you have a legal question, please contact us today. One of our Orlando criminal defense attorneys can meet with you to discuss your issue. Please call 407-377-0150 for more information.  

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Criminal Defense

Is America’s Juvenile Criminal System Broken and Outdated?

Each year, thousands of teens move through Florida’s juvenile criminal justice system. However, questions continue to mount about whether the justice system is failing Florida’s young people. A recent story from ABC News has highlighted many of the problems with juvenile systems around the country, including in Florida. Basics of Juvenile Justice At the center of the juvenile criminal justice system is the belief that minors are capable of rehabilitation. Although the adult justice system is oriented around punishment, the juvenile system focuses on reforming delinquent behaviors. As part of this system, juveniles are kept separate from the adult criminal population, and many offenders enter diversion programs that keep them out of jail. While on probation, the child and his or her family work on action plans for the child. Juvenile records are also sealed so that offenders will not have their youthful errors following them around for years later. As a result, juvenile offenders don’t need to disclose their criminal history when applying for a job or an apartment. However, Florida constantly undermines this juvenile justice system. Trying Juveniles as Adults As part of the “tough on crime” rhetoric that has been ascendant for the past 40 years, Florida passed a law that allows juveniles to be tried as adults in certain situations. The theory underpinning this law is that juveniles should “serve adult time for adult crimes” like homicide. Lionel Tate is one juvenile charged under this law. Tate was 14 when he wrestled a six-year-old, killing him. The prosecutor chose to prosecute Tate as an adult for the crime. Supporters of trying juveniles as adults argue that it is necessary, particularly in Florida. The state’s violent crime rate among juveniles is among the highest in the nation, almost 50% higher than the national average. Supporters also believe treating juveniles as adults will act as a deterrent to other juveniles, persuading them not to commit violent crimes. Counterproductive Response to Violent Crime Critics of the prosecution of Lionel Tate point out that charging juveniles as adults strikes at the very heart of juvenile justice. They also argue that sending juveniles to prisons increases the likelihood that they will reoffend—up to 33% more likely, based on one study. Instead, critics believe that even violent offenders should go through the juvenile system, like all other minors suspected of committing crimes. As critics point out, juveniles are not treated as adults because they have not fully developed emotionally or mentally. Treating them like rational adults is the wrong approach and will not yield the benefits that “tough on crime” advocates pretend. Speak with an Orlando Criminal Defense Attorney How Florida should treat juveniles will continue to be a source of controversy, with each side expressing valid concerns. Parents whose children are charged with crimes must realize that the state could potentially lock their child up for a very long time and must act accordingly. The best thing you can do right now is to hire an experienced criminal defense attorney. At Moses & Rooth, our Orlando defense attorneys we represent juveniles accused of crimes. To speak with one of our criminal defense lawyers, please schedule a free initial consultation by calling 407-377-0150.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Domestic Violence

Resources for Domestic Violence Victims

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), domestic violence affects about 1 in 3 women. The numbers were almost as high for men—1 in 4. Put differently, 24 people suffer physical violence from an intimate partner every minute. Unfortunately, it is not always easy for a victim to leave. In fact, 75% of the women who are killed each year by an abusive partner are killed after they have left the relationship. Instead, domestic violence victims need significant help. Read on for more information about the resources available to domestic violence victims. Create a Safety Plan Victims of domestic violence often experience a sense of powerlessness as well as panic during a violent explosion. It is very easy to forget what simple steps you can take to keep yourself safe. This is where a safety plan comes it. It should include the following information: An exit plan for leaving the home during a violent episode (identify the door or window you can use to exit). The place where you will keep your purse and keys in the event you need to leave quickly. Who you can tell about the violence and who you can ask to call the police if they suspect something has happened to you. Where you can go if you need to leave the home suddenly. Where you will stash extra money as well as important documents, such as birth certificates or Social Security Numbers. How you will secure safety in your new residence if you leave. If you need help creating a safety plan, you can contact Harbor House of Central Florida. Their 24-hour confidential hotline number is 407-886-2856. If you are outside central Florida, you can call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233. Someone is available to take your call 24 hours a day. Seek a Restraining Order A restraining order (called a “protective order” in Florida) is an order from a judge that prohibits an abuser from contacting you or coming near you. A protective order can also include other conditions, such as: Forcing the abuser to move out of the home Prohibiting the abuser from having a firearm Allowing you to use the family car Requiring that an abuser attend an alcohol or drug treatment program Granting you temporary custody of the children If your abuser violates the conditions of the order, then the police can pick him up and take him to jail. A judge can also keep the abuser in jail or order additional conditions to compel compliance with the protective order. In Florida, you can get an emergency protective order by filing an application in court. The judge will then hold a hearing, which your abuser can attend, to decide whether to grant a permanent protective order. Need Help? Contact Moses & Rooth At Moses & Rooth, we have significant experience assisting those involved in domestic violence cases in Orlando. Please contact us today to learn more about the services that we offer or give us a call at (407) 377-0150.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Drunk Driving

Florida’s Zero Tolerance for Underage DUI

Drunk drivers cause considerable damage on Florida’s roads. According to the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, over 5,000 crashes were caused by drunk drivers in 2016. These wrecks caused 461 deaths and over 3,000 injuries—staggering numbers that cost the state millions of dollars a year. Because those under 21 cannot legally consume alcohol, Florida unsurprisingly has a zero tolerance policy for underage DUI. If you or a loved one has been picked up for driving while intoxicated, you need to hire an experienced criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. Legal Limit Under Florida law, drivers must have a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) under 0.08. If your BAC is higher, then you have committed a DUI. Drivers under 21 have an even lower maximum BAC: any score of 0.02 or higher qualifies. This means that a single drink can render a young driver legally intoxicated. Punishments are serious for those who are under 21: You will lose your license for six months in an administrative suspension if this is your first offense. If it is a second offense, then you will lose your license for a year. If you refused to take a roadside test, your license will be suspended for a year. If this is your second or subsequent refusal, your license will be suspended for 18 months. If your BAC was 0.08% or higher, then you will receive the same punishments as an adult would. You can pay a fine of $500-1,000, have your license suspended for 180 days to 1 year, perform 50 hours of community service, and spend up to 6 months in county jail. The state can also impound your vehicle. If you were picked up for DUI and are under the age of 18, then you will lose your license for six months and must undergo a mandatory evaluation or complete an alcohol education program. Collateral Consequences of a DUI Conviction Losing your license for 6 months and doing some community service might not sound like stiff punishments. You might even get your parents to pay your fine for you. However, criminal convictions have repercussions that can last a long time and can make it hard for young adults to establish themselves. With a criminal record, you might experience the following: It can be harder to get an apartment It might be harder to obtain a job Your preferred college or university might reject you You might not qualify for scholarships You might not gain acceptance into the military For these reasons, you must take any arrest for under-21 DUI very seriously. At Moses & Rooth, we can review the circumstances surrounding your arrest and identify your strongest defense. Charged with an Under-21 DUI in Orlando? DUI is no laughing matter. The costs can be considerable and long-lasting. By contacting one of our Orlando DUI attorneys, you can give yourself the best chance of a favorable outcome, whether that involves a generous plea deal or fighting your charges in court. To learn more about how we can help you, please call 407-377-0150 to schedule your free consultation.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Criminal Defense

Exploring the Link Between Opioid Use and Criminal History

The opioid crisis continues to draw attention of the national media. The crisis has been used to explain everything from the increased mortality rates for some Americans to President Trump’s popularity in rural America. One aspect that has not drawn nearly enough attention is the link between opioid use and criminal history. According to recent research, however, the link between the two is strong. “More Common Than We Expected” As reported by MedPage Today, researchers who have examined the link between opioid use and crime have been impressed by the connection. At least 50% of those with a prescription opioid disorder had contact with the criminal justice system–contact that was more common than researchers expected. Researchers from various universities looked at data for nearly 79,000 respondents and classified people based on their highest use of opioids: 63.2% reported no opioid use 31.3% reported using opioids with a prescription 4.3% reported misusing opioids in ways their doctor had not prescribed 0.8% reported opioid dependence or abuse 0.4% reported using heroin As researchers found, the more a person used opioids, the more likely they had of criminal justice involvement: Only 15.9% of those with no opioid use had contact with the criminal justice system 22.4% of those who used opioids with a prescription had contact 33.2% of those who misused opioids had contact 51.7% of those with an opioid use disorder had contact 76.8% of those who used heroin had contact This recent study contradicts a study nearly 30 years ago from Scotland that found that moderate opioid use did not increase one’s likelihood of committing a crime. Instead, the most recent study has found a substantial difference in crime rates between those who do not use opioids and those who misuse or abuse them. More Treatment in Jail is Needed Given the higher rates of contact with the criminal justice system, opioid users and abusers are ending up in jail. Unfortunately, jails and prisons have not kept up with the times. Although they treat a variety of health conditions—such as diabetes and hypertension—they currently do not have the capacity to offer treatment for opioid abuse. Unfortunately, public pressure does not seem to be building, perhaps because people assume that being in jail is a good chance for someone to detox. However, as experts have explained, cutting off opioids from an addict does not cure them. Instead, it puts them at greater risk of death from an overdose later because their tolerance will be lower. What abusers and addicts need is medication-assisted treatment, which is the most effective means of treating opioid addiction. Based on one analysis, addicts who leave a medication-assisted treatment program experienced a 60% drop in overdose deaths. Orlando Criminal Defense Attorneys in Your Corner After an arrest, our clients are in fear of the future and many are also struggling with an opioid addiction. You need caring legal guidance. At Moses & Rooth, our team of experienced criminal defense attorneys has your best interests at heart. We can work diligently toward a favorable outcome, whether a plea deal, dismissed charges, or an acquittal at trial. For more information about how we can help, please schedule a free consultation by calling 407-377-0150.

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