| Read Time: 2 minutes | Drug Charges

Is America Seeing the “War on Drugs” Differently?

The United States has waged a “War on Drugs” for more than five decades. By most measures, it isn’t going very well. In states like Florida, the sale and use of illegal drugs remain prevalent. And now there is a new crisis in the form of prescription opioid abuse. Given the increasing financial, political, and human cost of treating drug addiction as a law enforcement problem, many prominent figures have started publicly pushing for at least partial legalization of certain drugs. The Push to Legalize (Some) Drugs Gains Political Support In April 2016, a group of more than 1,000 international dignitaries signed a letter to then-United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon asking him to use his position to call for “reform of global drug control policies.” The authors included former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, former Mexican presidents Ernesto Zedillo and Vicente Fox, former U.S. Secretary of State George Shultz, and U.S. Senator and 2016 presidential candidate Bernie Sanders. The authors noted that the current war on drugs has “created a vast illicit market that has enriched criminal organizations, corrupted governments, triggered explosive violence, distorted economic markets and undermined basic moral values.” The authors went on to emphasize the racially discriminatory nature of the drug war, noting that “[t]ens of millions of people, mostly poor and racial and ethnic minorities, were incarcerated, mostly for low-level and non-violent drug law violations, with little if any benefit to public security.” More recently, on June 28, 2018, U.S. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer introduced a bill to remove marijuana as a federally prohibited “controlled substance.” Schumer’s proposal would also provide funds to assist states in expunging and sealing the criminal records of individuals previously convicted of illegal marijuana possession. A similar marijuana legalization bills has also been introduced by New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker. A number of states have already moved on their own to decriminalize and even permit the sale of marijuana for personal use within their borders. This has created understandable conflict with the federal government, which still considers any use of marijuana–even for medicinal purposes–a crime. But the U.S. will soon face external pressure on its northern border to loosen its marijuana restrictions. On October 17, 2018, Canada’s Cannabis Act takes effect. Earlier this year, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government secured approval for legislation that “legalizes and regulates” marijuana. Individual Canadian provinces will still have the authority to set specific rules for cannabis use, including the legal minimum age, how much someone can possess, and where drugs may be purchased. The Drug War Remains in Full Effect in Florida Meanwhile, here in Florida the state is still taking small steps towards legalizing cannabis products for purely medicinal use. It may be sometime before state officials will consider following Canada’s lead and moving towards a legalize-and-regulate system. So you still need to be conscious of the drug war and its potential impacts on your liberties. If you are charged with a drug crime in Florida and need assistance from a qualified Orlando criminal defense attorney, contact Moses & Rooth at (407) 377-0150 today.

Continue Reading

| Read Time: 2 minutes | Drug Charges

Signs Your Neighbor May be Involved in Manufacturing or Selling Drugs

It’s not exactly news to point out the Orlando area has a problem with drug dealers and illegal drug manufacturers. Indeed, many drug operations work inconspicuously out of residential homes. Perhaps you suspect there is a dealer or producer in your own neighborhood. Here are a few common signs, based on advice from law enforcement, that may indicate your neighbor is involved with the drug trade. There’s an unusual amount of foot traffic in and out of the house. Lots of people run (legal) small businesses out of their homes. But if you notice a large amount of people coming and going from a house, particularly at night or outside of normal business hours, that suggests there may be something fishy going on. Take note if there are a lot of strangers–i.e., people who don’t live in the neighborhood–paying quick visits, making deliveries, and exchanging small items for cash. Your neighbors appear to be financially successful despite not having jobs. If you live in a run-of-the-mill, middle-class neighborhood, it won’t escape notice if someone moves in and owns a flashy car or a big-screen television. In and of itself, this is not cause for alarm. But if your new neighbors do not appear to have jobs or any obvious source of income, that may suggest something more sinister. The house itself does not look or smell right. If you smell noxious or musty odors coming from a house, that could suggest the presence of a meth lab. Additional visual cues include blacked-out windows (even during the day) and unusually high fences or similar security measures that seem out of place for the neighborhood. You notice drug paraphernalia in the area. Drug dealers–and their customers–are not always neat. If you find syringes or small plastic bags littering the area, that’s a good indication there’s at least drug use in the area. Also take note if there are a high number of chemical containers in your neighbor’s trash, such as paint thinner, antifreeze, and drain cleaner. All of these items are used in the production of meth. Should I Call the Police? Of course, suspicion is not evidence. And many people are understandably reluctant to contact the police based on nothing more than a hunch and some unusual activity. So what should you do if you suspect drug activity? One step you can take is to check and see if your neighbors have a criminal record. Arrests and convictions are a matter of public record. And there are a number of online services that allow you to conduct a more comprehensive criminal background check. But above all else, never attempt to confront someone if you suspect they are manufacturing or selling drugs. If you honestly believe there is a problem, you should contact the local police or sheriff’s office and let them look into it. Do not take the law into your own hands. Have You Been Falsely Accused of Making or Selling Drugs? On the other side of the fence, many Orlando-area residents find themselves the target of false and unsubstantiated drug charges. If you are arrested and charged with possession or distribution, you need to contact an experienced Orlando criminal defense lawyer as soon as possible. Contact the offices of Moses & Rooth, Attorneys at Law, at (407) 377-0150, to schedule a consultation with a member of our team today.

Continue Reading

| Read Time: 2 minutes | Drug Charges

What Is Drug Addiction?

Our society has been conditioned to think of drug addiction as a legal problem. Every year thousands of people in Florida and throughout the United States are charged with drug crimes ranging from possession of banned substances to prescription drug fraud. But in our political rush to judge and condemn drug users, we often forget they are suffering from a serious mental health disorder–namely, drug addiction. Drug Addiction Is a Brain Disease, Not a Lack of “Willpower” Obviously, drug addiction covers a wide variety of substances. Some are legal, such as alcohol or nicotine, while others are classified as “controlled substances” like cocaine and heroin. But whatever the drug involved, addiction manifests itself in the same way. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), addiction is “a chronic, relapsing brain disease that is characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use, despite harmful consequences.” The critical thing to understand here is that addiction is a disease. It is not a reflection of the victim’s willpower or personal ethics. Many people with no criminal backgrounds or history of violent behavior become drug addicts. Yet there is still a strong social stigma attached to drug addiction because many addicts initially take drugs “to feel good.” It is true that many drugs–especially stimulants such as cocaine–produce euphoria and a sense of relaxation in the user. But the problem is that addiction slowly alters the brain chemistry of the user, to the point where they become unable to function without a steady supply of the drug. It is then no longer a question of taking the drug to feel good–it is now a matter of avoiding the pain of withdrawal if the brain’s addiction is not fed. This leads many people to take any steps necessary to obtain a “fix,” without regard to the potential consequences for themselves and their loved ones. So even when an addiction started out as a voluntary behavior, at a certain point the addict may objective lose self-control and routinely engage in self-destructive behavior. Are You at Greater Risk for Drug Addiction–and Possible Legal Problems? Not everyone who uses alcohol or drugs will develop an addiction. Indeed, there is no 100 percent reliable way to know in advance who will (or won’t) become an addict. But public health professionals and scientists have identified a number of risk factors that increase a person’s chances of becoming an addict. According to the NIDA, many of these factors are social rather than biological. For instance, children who are exposed to drugs from an early age at school or in the home are at greater risk for addiction. Similarly, a child who grows up in poverty or lacking parental supervision may turn to drugs to cope with their situation. Unfortunately, by the time a young person develops a drug addiction, they may already find themselves in trouble with the law. Drug possession is still a crime under federal and state law regardless of the defendant’s mental health status. That is why it is important to work with a qualified Orlando criminal defense attorney if you are facing any kind of drug charge. Contact Moses & Rooth, Attorneys at Law, at (407) 377-0150 today.

Continue Reading

| Read Time: 2 minutes | Criminal Defense

Florida Governor Signs Bill to Combat Opioid Epidemic

Drugs are widely used in the United States, but it’s not just illegal ones that are leading to criminal charges and deaths. Prescription drugs have become an epidemic in the country over the past decade. People are living longer and relying on painkillers to help them feel good. The problem with prescription drugs, though, is that they stop working after a while. They become less effective, so some people take more and more. As a result, many overdose and die. Opioids are the most commonly used prescription drugs, and they are causing numerous deaths across the United States. People are also selling them to make money, which is considered illegal sale of prescription drugs. This is often a felony crime. Fortunately, Florida is being proactive and taking steps to combat this crisis. Gov. Rick Scott recently signed a new law that will place stricter limits on opioid use in a bid to address the epidemic, which claims at least 16 lives a day in Florida alone. The comprehensive measure will include education programs and limited availability of these addictive drugs. The state legislature has made combating the opioid epidemic a priority. The new law will earmark more money for education programs. It will place tougher limits on opioid prescriptions. It will also require that doctors check the state database and make sure that patients are not “doctor shopping” and getting prescriptions from multiple health care providers. The situation is dire in Florida. Between 2015 and 2016, opioid overdose deaths skyrocketed 35 percent. In 2016, opioids were responsible for the deaths of 5,725 people in the state. Fentanyl is the most popular opioid in some areas of Florida. Some versions of fentanyl can be 5,000 times more lethal than heroin. Manatee County suffered the highest rate of deaths from this drug in 2016. The new law, which takes effect July 1, has a goal of reducing the number of prescription drug addicts in Florida. It will place the toughest restrictions on Schedule II drugs such as fentanyl and oxycontin. Doctors would be able to prescribe only a three-day limit, although a seven-day limit would be allowed in some cases. There would be no limit for those with chronic pain, trauma or a terminal illness such as cancer. The new law includes an upgrade to Florida’s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program. It would make it easier to track a person’s medication history across the nation. This means that doctors in adjacent states could track a Florida resident’s prescriptions and refuse to fill any if it appears the person is attempting to get prescriptions from multiple doctors. Contact an Orlando Criminal Defense Attorney Today Even though prescription drugs are often obtained legally, you can still get in legal trouble for fraud and illegal possession and sale relates to these drugs. You could face felony charges for selling prescription drugs. If this is the case for you, you need legal help right away. Contact the aggressive criminal defense lawyers at Moses & Rooth. We will assess every aspect of your case to help you formulate a solid defense. Schedule your free consultation today. Call our office at (407) 377-0150 or contact us online.

Continue Reading

| Read Time: 2 minutes | Drug Charges

Does Florida have a Heroin Epidemic?

There has been a lot of talk in the news recently about the effects of unchecked opioid abuse in Florida and throughout the country. Sadly, this is not just a case of media hype. Opioids such as heroin, fentanyl, and oxycodone are highly addictive–and fatal. According to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, in 2015 there were nearly 3,900 opioid-related deaths reported in the state. As reported by NBC News, this reflected nearly 12 percent of all fatal opioid doses in the United States for 2015, the last year for which complete data was available. Central Florida Governments Focus on Treatment, Preventing Deaths Here in the Orlando area, the Orange County sheriff’s office has responded to more than 150 calls related to heroin and opioid overdoses during the first few weeks of 2018. Local law enforcement and public health officials have responded by providing training in administering naloxone, a drug that can “override the effects of an overdose” and potentially save an addicted person’s life, according to a report by Fox 35 television in Orlando. Other central Florida law enforcement agencies are taking a similar proactive stance in combating the heroin epidemic. In Marion County, Ocala police chief Greg Graham told the media at a February 6 press conference that his officers responded to 78 opioid overdoses in his city during 2017. Sadly, 16 of these overdoses were fatal, and the “average age” of the deceased individuals was just 38 years old. In an attempt to curb this epidemic, Graham and Ocala Mayor Kent Guinn announced the city would implement an “amnesty initiative.” This will allow individuals who suffer from opioid addiction to approach local authorities and seek treatment without fear of criminal prosecution. As police chief Graham noted, there was no way to “arrest our way out of this crisis,” although he said officers would pick up struggling addicts and take them to a treatment facility. Graham emphasized, however, that amnesty would not protect anyone caught selling or distributing heroin or other opioids in Ocala. To the contrary, the chief told the local press his department was actively pursuing at least two separate criminal cases right now. And he said he was prepared to seek murder charges against dealers whose opioids could be directly tied to overdose deaths. Heroin Possession Remains a Felony in Florida Indeed, do not confuse public health efforts to combat opioid addiction with a loosening of Florida’s strict heroin laws. Opioids are not treated the same as “recreational” drugs such as marijuana. Possession of any quantity of heroin or fentanyl–even trace amounts found in your vehicle–is a third-degree felony in Florida. This means you could be sent to jail for five years and ordered to pay a $5,000 fine. Especially in the current political climate surrounding opioids, do not allow police or prosecutors to run roughshod over your constitutional rights. If you are charged with possession of heroin or any other dangerous drug, you need to speak with an experienced Orlando criminal defense attorney right away. Call the offices of Moses & Rooth, Attorneys at Law, at (407) 377-0150 today if you need immediate legal assistance.

Continue Reading

| Read Time: 2 minutes | Criminal Defense

How Much Marijuana Can I Possess Before it is Considered a Felony?

How Much Weed Is A Felony in Florida? To many people, marijuana is considered a harmless drug. However, given that the laws vary from state to state, many would disagree. While it may seem as though marijuana is pretty much decriminalized in the United States, some states still have harsh penalties in place when it comes to possession of the drug. Florida, on the other hand, is one of the strictest states in the nation. It’s not lenient at all, even for first-time offenders. Medical marijuana was only just approved in the state, and it comes with numerous restrictions. For example, marijuana cannot be smoked, but it can be used in other forms. Possession of any amount can get you in trouble with the law. You could face a misdemeanor for having even the smallest amount on you, and it doesn’t take much to get a felony on your criminal record. Florida Marijuana Laws – How Many Grams Is A Felony? If you are caught in possession of 20 grams or less of marijuana, you will face misdemeanor charges. The penalties include a $1,000 fine and one year in jail. Keep in mind that 20 grams is a very small amount—just 0.705 ounces. And if you’re caught with any amount over 20 grams, the penalties get much stiffer, as you’ll be charged with a felony. If you are in possession of anywhere between 20 grams and 25 pounds of marijuana, the penalties include up to five years in prison and a $5,000 fine. If you are in possession of the drug within 1,000 feet of a school or park, it is also considered a felony, punishable by a $10,000 fine and 15 years in prison. If you are caught with 25-2,000 pounds of marijuana, this is a felony charge punishable by 3-15 years in prison and a $25,000 fine. If you have anywhere from 2,000-10,000 pounds of the drug in your possession, you will face 7-30 years in prison and a $50,000 fine. If you are in possession of 10,000 pounds or more, you will face a hefty fine of $200,000 as well as 15-30 years in prison. Possession of drug paraphernalia is classified as a misdemeanor, which carries a fine of $1,000 and up to one year in jail. In addition to the above penalties, any marijuana conviction can cause a person’s driver’s license to be suspended for one year. Contact an Orlando Marijuana Defense Attorney Marijuana possession can be a state and federal crime, depending on the circumstances. While possession of marijuana has been basically decriminalized in many states, it is still considered a federal crime. Drug laws can be confusing, especially when it comes to marijuana. Even the smallest amount can get you charged with a felony in Florida. Let the aggressive Orlando criminal defense attorneys at Moses & Rooth Attorneys at Law defend you against the drug charges you face, no matter how serious. We are available 24/7 to assist you, so give us a call today at (407) 377-0150 to schedule a free consultation.

Continue Reading

| Read Time: 2 minutes | Drug Charges

Consequences of Mailing Drugs and Other Banned Substances in Orlando, FL

When mailing Christmas packages this holiday season, be careful not to mail any banned substances such as drugs. Even though marijuana is legal in some states, you cannot send it via the post office. This is called drug trafficking and comes with felony charges. Approximately 1,000 people are arrested every year for drug trafficking via the U.S. Postal Service. In 2015, 34,305 pounds of marijuana were seized by the USPS, making it the most commonly seized drug. Why do people opt to choose to ship marijuana via USPS? Because it offers protection thanks to the Fourth Amendment. Under federal law, postal workers cannot open a package without probable cause and a search warrant. Other carriers such as UPS, FedEx and DHL do not offer such protection. They can open packages at their discretion. Penalties for Mailing Drugs When you use the postal service in an illegal manner, you face hefty penalties. Because the United State Postal Service is a federal entity, any illegal use will result in a felony. It’s important to remember that marijuana is a Schedule I drug, which means that mailing any amount under 50 grams will result in five years in prison. If you mail a larger amount or more dangerous drug like heroin or cocaine, the penalties will increase from there. These penalties apply not only to the person who mailed the package, but to the recipient as well. If you knew that you were going to receive a package of drugs, you would be considered just as guilty. In fact, as a recipient, you could face drug trafficking charges in the state in which the package was mailed as well as the state in which you received it. If you received marijuana in the mail by mistake, though, you would not face charges. And yes, this has happened—in Orlando, of all places. A woman and her fiance ordered some storage totes from Amazon earlier this year. They were in for a shock when they received the storage containers, along with 65 pounds of marijuana. The package was shipped via UPS from Massachusetts by Amazon’s Warehouse Deals. The entire package weighed more than 93 pounds—a hefty weight for just four 27-gallon storage containers. The couple tried to get answers from Amazon, but went back and forth with customer service for more than a month. They never spoke to a supervisor or received an apology. They did, however, receive a $150 gift card and were told that there was nothing else that could be done. The customers lived in fear for the first several days and actually stayed at another location. Local police are still investigating the case and have made no arrests so far. Contact an Orlando Criminal Defense Attorney Even though marijuana is legal in some states, it is still illegal at the federal level. Because the United States Postal Service is a federal government entity, sending any amount of any drug in the mail is a serious crime. Florida has strict drug laws—some of the harshest laws in the country. If you are facing charges for mailing drugs, you need aggressive legal representation. Contact the offices of Moses & Rooth Attorneys at Law today at (407) 377-0150 to discuss your situation with us.

Continue Reading

| Read Time: 2 minutes | Drug Charges

What is Florida’s Drug Monitoring Program?

Illegal drug use is not the only substance abuse issue in the United States. Prescription drug abuse is also on the rise. Many people have died from overdoses, and now many states are taking steps to prevent this problem. In 2010, Florida had more than 900 unregulated pain management clinics. The 49 oxycodone clinics in the state were once selling more than 1 million oxycodone pills a month. Approximately 10 people were dying from prescription drug overdoses in the state each day. That changed in 2011 when the state’s prescription drug monitoring program became active. The Department of Health manages Electronic-Florida Online Reporting of Controlled Substances Evaluation (E-FORCSE), which is a database that shows each transaction when a person is dispensed a controlled substance. The E-FORCSE database collects and stores dispensing information related to controlled substance prescriptions. The information is made available to health care professionals, law enforcement agencies and regulatory agencies so that they can perform investigations as needed.   It costs $500,000 a year to operate the E-FORCSE system. The money is raised through a non-profit, tax exempt foundation. The State Surgeon General appoints the board of directors. E-FORCSE was implemented to encourage safety when prescribing controlled substances. It also aims to reduce drug abuse within Florida. The system is compliant with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) as it pertains to protected health information (PHI). It also complies with all other state and federal security and privacy laws. Controlled Substances Reporting Requirements Florida Statutes 893.0551 has new guidelines for physicians and pain management clinics. It requires all physicians who dispense Schedule II, III or IV controlled substances to report it each time a controlled substance is dispensed to an individual. Currently, the transactions must be reported within seven days. However, effective January 1, 2018, transactions involving controlled substances must be reported to the E-FORCSE database by the end of the next business day. This change is from House Bill 557 and ensures that physicians have the most current information available. How Has Florida’s Drug Monitoring Program Helped? E-FORCSE has proven to be extremely helpful for physicians in Florida. The problem of overprescribing can be prevented because doctors can easily check a patient’s prescription history and determine right away whether or not a patient has been doctor shopping. E-FORCSE collected more than 112 million prescription records as of July 1, 2014. More than 25,000 physicians in Florida have signed up for the program. Oxycodone rates have dropped by 41 percent since E-FORCSE has been implemented. Contact an Orlando Criminal Defense Attorney Prescription drug abuse is a serious problem in our society. Florida was once known as the “Pill Mill” of the United States, so E-FORCSE is helping the state take the proper steps to prevent abuse. If you are facing charges for prescription drug abuse, your first step should be to contact an Orlando criminal defense lawyer who will aggressively fight to protect your rights. Contact the offices of Moses & Rooth Attorneys at Law today at (407) 377-0150 to discuss your situation with us.

Continue Reading

| Read Time: 2 minutes | Drug Charges

Legality of Marijuana Money and Banks

Marijuana is now legal for medical and/or recreational use in 29 states and the District of Columbia. While marijuana is legal at the state level, it’s still a federal crime. This causes not only confusion in the cannabis industry, but it opens the door to myriad complexities as well. Banks are regulated by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), which was created by Congress. Due to federal oversight, most banks are refusing to handle money created by the medical marijuana industry. They are not willing to fill out disclosure reports, which became a requirement under President Obama. There is also a fear that President Trump’s administration— which is anti-drug— may seize assets and prosecute bank employees. One bank, however, is bravely going where no bank has gone before. First Green Bank—based in Orlando—is the only financial institution in Florida that is willing to serve the pot industry. Founded in 2009, First Green Bank originally focused on the environment, providing loans on green construction, solar systems and electric cars. Now, the bank is focusing on a different type of green—marijuana. Of Florida’s seven medical marijuana businesses licensed by the state, First Green Bank serves six. Five more have just opened and another five are expected to appear in the next few months. First Green Bank hopes to capture the entire market by the fall. The bank will also focus on physicians and attorneys. First Green Bank works by taking the cash from the patient—no credit cards are allowed—and shipping it to a Federal Reserve vault through an armored pickup service. The bank never touches the cash, and the arrangement meets certain requirements so the bank is not accused of money laundering. The federal government isn’t totally in approval of the bank’s activities, though. The officers of First Green Bank sought guidance from the Florida Office of Financial Regulation as well as the FDIC. Those agencies pointed to information provided by the Justice Department. It states that banks are required to file reports of marijuana transactions and label them as “suspicious activities.” In the United States, just 368 financial institutions are serving the marijuana industry. However, some are having second thoughts after learning about the suspicious activity reports. However, because only a select few companies can be licensed to dispense, reporting is much easier. But there is also the issue of the high costs of serving the accounts. It will be difficult for banks to make money off of marijuana. In fact, First Green Bank has not made any money as of yet. Need Help With a Florida Drug Case? While medical marijuana is legal in Florida, there are still many legalities involved when it comes to drugs. The fact that marijuana is still not legal at the federal level makes things even more complicated. If you are charged with a drug crime, get legal representation. The Florida criminal defense attorneys at Moses & Rooth, Attorneys at Law can provide you with a solid defense. Contact us today at (407) 377-0150 to schedule a free consultation.

Continue Reading

| Read Time: 2 minutes | Drug Charges

Possession vs. Intent to Distribute: What’s the Difference?

When it comes to drugs, there are two main charges that a person can face: possession and intent to distribute. Possession refers to someone having drugs for personal use only. Intent to distribute refers to drug trafficking and the sale of drugs. While possession is typically a minor crime, it can cause a person to be charged with a felony, especially if the person is found in possession of large amounts of drugs. If you are charged with a drug crime in Florida, find out more about the charges and penalties you could face. Drug Possession in Florida Drug possession refers to drugs found not only on the person, but also drugs that are within the person’s control. This means that the drugs could be found in a home or vehicle, and could still be legally considered in the person’s possession. In order to be charged with drug possession, the prosecution must prove three elements: The substance is in fact illegal. Since a substance can look like a drug but not necessarily be one, it may need to be analyzed by a crime lab. The person’s knowledge of the drug. It must be proven that the defendant knew the drug was illegal. The person’s control of the drug. This is easy to prove if the drugs were found on the defendant, but if police find drugs in a vehicle or home, proving that they belong to a particular person is more challenging. A person could face first degree misdemeanor, third degree felony or first degree felony charges for drug possession, depending on the amount. Penalties range from up to one year in jail to possibly 30 years in prison. Fines could go up to $250,000. Intent to Distribute in Florida A person can be charged with intent to distribute a drug if a person is caught with an unusually large amount of a drug and it can be proven that the person intended to sell the drug. Intent to distribute is a drug trafficking charge that comes with serious penalties. To convict a person of this crime, the prosecution must prove these two elements: The defendant knew he or she was selling drugs to others. The substances the defendant was selling were illegal. Intent to distribute is considered a felony in Florida. A person can be charged with a first, second or third degree felony. A third degree felony is punishable by up to five years in prison and a $5,000 fine. A second degree felony can result in 15 years in prison and a $10,000 fine. A person charged with a second degree felony may face 30 years in prison and a $10,000 fine. Need Help With a Florida Drug Case? Florida is a state with tough drug laws. Drug crimes could cause you to face felony charges. As such, you could face stiff fines, prison time and a huge mark on your criminal record. It’s important to have strong defense from an experienced legal professional. At the offices of Moses & Rooth, Attorneys at Law, our Florida criminal defense attorneys have experience as both prosecutors and defense lawyers in drug cases. We can put our experience to work for you. Contact us today at (407) 377-0150 to schedule a free consultation.

Continue Reading