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A Look at the Extreme Consequences of Teenage Sexting in Florida

Many parents are in denial when it comes to sexting. They think their children would never do such a thing, but sexting is more common than they think. Approximately 40 percent of teens have sexted at some point. While boys do it more often than girls, girls are more likely to send nude photos. Seventy percent of these teens send the texts to their boyfriend or girlfriend. The majority of girls, however, do it as a joke. Sexting is no laughing matter in Florida, though. While the first offense is a non-criminal violation, a subsequent offense could result in misdemeanor and even felony charges. A teen could spend many years in prison and be forced to register as a sex offender. While it’s important to protect one’s privacy, the laws may be too strict in this case. Sexting is being equated to child porn, when it is often simply two peers acting like teens. A teen sending and receiving sexually suggestive texts and photos should not be treated as a hardened criminal. If you’re a parent of a teen, read on to learn more about the laws regarding sexting in Florida so you can educate your child about the consequences and prevent them from getting in trouble with the law. What the Law Says Under Florida Statutes 847.0141, sexting between minors is prohibited. A minor can be charged with sexting if he or she uses a cell phone, tablet, computer or other electronic device to send nude images or photos to another minor. A person in possession of these images can also be charged with sexting, so both the sender and recipient could face charges. However, there are some instances when a recipient may not face charges. If a minor is in receipt of a nude photo, but did not solicit it or forward it to a third party, and took steps to report it to a parent, the school or law enforcement, then he or she is not in violation of the law. A first offense is considered a violation punishable by eight hours of community service, a $60 fine and/or educational classes on the dangers of sexting. If the person is charged with a second offense, the charge is a first degree misdemeanor, punishable by one year in jail and a fine of $1,000. A third offense is charged as a third degree felony. The punishment becomes hefty, with five years of prison and five years of probation. There is also a $5,000 fine and the person could be forced to register as a sex offender. Images sent within a 24-hour period are treated as a single offense. The law does not apply when two consenting adults are sexting. However, it can become child porn if one person is an adult and the other is a minor. Contact an Orlando Criminal Defense Attorney Teens will be teens, but when it comes to sending sexually explicit photos, it’s best to avoid this practice if you are under 18. Florida has some of the strictest laws in this regard, and you could end up with a felony charge and forced registry as a sex offender if you’re not careful. If your teen is facing texting charges, seek legal help right away. The aggressive Orlando criminal defense attorneys at Moses & Rooth Attorneys at Law will work to protect your rights. Contact our offices today at (407) 377-0150 to see how we can help you with your case.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Criminal Defense

5 Orlando Events for Pro Bowl Week

This time of year is exciting for football fans. February 4 marks the 52nd annual Super Bowl. If you can’t wait until February to watch an exciting football game, Orlando residents have the Pro Bowl coming a week earlier, on January 28. The Pro Bowl is the NFL’s all-star game and will be coming to Camping World Stadium in Orlando. Many popular football players will be on hand as pros from the National Football Conference (NFC) take on pros from the American Football Conference (AFC). There will be plenty of events going on in the Orlando area during Pro Bowl week. Here are some of the ones happening near you. Pro Bowl Week The ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex in Kissimmee hosts Pro Bowl Week. This is where “The Best Meets the Next.” There will be a variety of fun activities going on from January 24-27, 2018 between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. each day. This free event is for the entire family. More details will be released soon. Pro Bowl Experience The Pro Bowl Experience will also be happening at the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex from January 24-27, 2018. It happens each day from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and admission is free. This event is a festival for football fans of all ages. There will be football-themed activities and interactive games, providing a fun experience for the entire family. Pro Bowl Player Practices The Pro Bowl Player Practices will also be held at the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex. From January 24-27, 2018 at 10 a.m. each day, you can watch your favorite NFL players practice and get autographs afterward. In order to attend, you must register for the Fan Mobile Pass. You will be allowed into the seating area on a first come, first serve basis, so get there early for the best seats. The NFC and AFC teams will practice at the same time. Pro Bowl Skills Showdown The Pro Bowl Skills Showdown is also located at the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex. It happens just one day only—January 24, 2018 at noon. The showdown features players from both the AFC and NFC leagues. To attend the taping, get your free tickets here. 2018 NFL Pro Bowl Game This is the game football fans have been waiting for all season. The 2018 NFL Pro Bowl Game is held at Camping World Stadium on January 28, 2018 at 3 p.m. Bring your friends and family and cheer on your favorite NFL players. Before the game, enjoy the GameDay Fan Plaza celebration. Contact an Orlando Criminal Defense Attorney Sporting events can sometimes get rowdy, as many people celebrate by drinking alcohol. Fights often occur and spectators may get in trouble with the law. If you are facing criminal charges during Pro Bowl week or any time of the year, the aggressive Orlando criminal defense attorneys at Moses & Rooth Attorneys at Law will be there for you. Let us protect your legal rights. Contact our offices at (407) 377-0150 to schedule a free consultation. We are available 24/7.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Criminal Defense

Steps to Cleaning Up Your Criminal Record in Orlando

When you are convicted of a crime in Florida, not only can you end up paying steep financial penalties and even serving a term of imprisonment, but you can lose many opportunities once you have completed the terms of your sentence. For instance, convictions can prevent individuals from obtaining student loans and other lines of credit, and they can prevent you from being approved for a housing rental application or a job application. To be sure, each time you fill out an application that asks about your criminal background or criminal history, you will need to admit to your conviction. Florida residents with felony convictions also lose their right to vote. A history of conviction can have lifelong implications for many Floridians, regardless of the severity of the conviction. In many cases, Floridians are wrongly accused and wrongly convicted of crimes. Even when there was no wrongful conviction, a person with a history of a criminal conviction can change his or her life yet remain weighed down by that criminal history. There is good news: you may be able to have your criminal record sealed or expunged. What Does It Mean to Seal or Expunge Criminal Convictions? Under Florida law (Fla. Stat. Section 943.053), criminal history records are public for adults unless that record is sealed or expunged. What does it mean to seal or expunge a record? According to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE), sealing a record places your criminal history record “under highly restricted access.” To be clear, sealing the record does not wipe away your criminal history, but it does make it very difficult to access except under particular circumstances. When a record is sealed, it remains in the criminal record system. Expungement is different, and for most individuals with a criminal history record, expunging the record is preferable to sealing it. The FDLE explains that, when a record is expunged, it is “removed from record systems or files and destroyed.” In other words, there is no longer an official history of your criminal record. How Can I Get My Criminal History Records Sealed or Expunged? There are several ways that criminal records can be sealed or expunged, including but not limited to the following: Wrongful arrest: if your arrest was made “contrary to law or by mistake,” then you can seek an administrative expungement under Florida Statutes Section 943.0581; Lawful self-defense: if you were arrested for and/or charged with a crime for which it is later determined that you acted in lawful self-defense, you can apply for expungement under Florida Statutes Section 943.0585; and Juvenile diversion program: if you were arrested for and charged with certain crime(s) as a juvenile and completed a diversion program, you may be able to have your record expunged under Florida Statutes Section 943.0582 (there is also the possibility of an automatic juvenile expungement given certain other conditions are met). Typically, the court-ordered sealing of criminal records may be possible for certain types of violations under Florida law (Fla. Stat. Section 943.059), but sealing requires that the individual first seek a “Certificate of Eligibility” to seal or expunge the record. This is also a necessary first step for expungement. Contact a Criminal Defense Attorney in Orlando Do you have questions about cleaning up your criminal record in Orlando? An experienced Orlando criminal defense attorney can speak with you about your case and your options today. Contact Moses & Rooth to learn more about how we can assist you.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Criminal Defense

Most Popular Legal Drama TV Series

For decades, Floridians have been watching legal dramas on television. Whether you grew up watching Perry Mason or more recently have begun watching Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, television shows that deal with the law are extremely popular. While these shows do not always “get the law right,” so to speak, they have helped to introduced thousands of viewers to some of the complex aspects of criminal law in Florida and throughout the country. What are some of the most popular legal drama programs on television, and what can we learn about the law by watching them? Popular Legal Dramas Get Ranked By Viewers What legal dramas are most popular with viewers? According to a list from Ranker.com, the following shows are among the most commonly watched legal television shows: Law & Order; Law & Order: Special Victims Unit; The Practice; CSI: Crime Scene Investigation; Boston Legal; Suits; The Good Wife; Perry Mason; L.A. Law; Matlock; and Ally McBeal. What do these shows have in common? In each of them, viewers watch courtroom scenes unfold—some of the legal matters are issues of civil law in which a plaintiff may be seeking damages from a defendant, such as is common in legal dramas like Suits and The Good Wife. In other legal dramas, such as the Law & Order programs, Perry Mason, Matlock, or the various incarnations of CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, we primarily view criminal trials that follow either the prosecution and police investigations team, or the defense attorney who is working to building a successful defense for the client and to prove that client’s innocence. These shows are compelling, and they routinely receive high ratings, keeping legal dramas on a wide variety of networks. What else should viewers know about these television shows and the information they provide? Learning More About the “CSI Effect” on Juries According to an article from the American Bar Association (ABA), the term “CSI Effect” was coined to refer to a “phenomenon whereby high-tech, forensic evidence dramatized in television crime dramas such as CSI, Law & Order, and Forensic Files theoretically promotes unrealistic expectation among jurors of how apparently clearly and definitely forensic evidence can determine innocence or guilt or, from the perspective of the civil litigator, causation or liability.” In other words, viewers watch these popular legal dramas and assume that courtroom proceedings and investigations work the same way in real life and in real legal practice. The “CSI Effect” seems to be so strong in jury trials, in fact, that jurors often will refuse to convict, according to the article, or to find in favor of a plaintiff in a civil trial, simply because it seems as though there is insufficient forensic evidence. The truth is that high-tech and forensic evidence simply is not as prevalent in real court cases as it is on television, and making assumptions about a real case based on knowledge from legal dramas can be problematic. None of this means, of course, that you should stop watching your favorite legal television dramas. Instead, you might simply shift your expectations in the event that you are involved in a real legal case. Contact a Florida Criminal Defense Attorney Do you have questions about how to build a strong defense in your case? An experienced Florida criminal defense attorney can assist you. Contact Moses & Rooth for more information about our services.

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Claiming Intoxication in a Criminal Defense Case in Florida

Learning that you are facing criminal charges in Florida can be scary and frustrating, especially when you do not have any recollection of the crime itself because you were intoxicated or otherwise impaired. If you are charged with a crime in Florida but you were under the influence of alcohol or drugs at the time the crime was committed, can you argue that your intoxication is a defense to the criminal charges? In other words, if you did commit the crime but did not know what you were doing due to your impairment, is that a valid defense strategy under Florida law? Learning More Voluntary Intoxication as a Defense Under Florida Law Generally speaking, in order to be guilty of a crime, you must have had intent to commit the crime (known in the law as mens rea). When an individual is so intoxicated that she or he could not possibly have had intent to commit a crime—even though she or he committed that crime—can that individual still face criminal charges? Can that individual argue that she has a diminished responsibility because she was so impaired that she could not have had the intent to commit the crime? Florida law (Florida Statutes Section 775.051) deals specifically with voluntary intoxication as a defense to a criminal act. The statute clarifies that “voluntary intoxication resulting from the consumption, injection, or other use of alcohol or other controlled substance . . . is not a defense to any offense proscribed by law.” In other words, under Florida statutory law, a person who has been charged with a crime cannot use voluntary intoxication as a defense, even if she was so inebriated that she could not form intent to commit the crime. To be sure, the statute goes on to clarify that “evidence of a defendant’s voluntary intoxication is not admissible to show that the defendant lacked the specific intent to commit an offense and is not admissible to show that the defendant was insane at the time of the offense.” To be clear, if a defendant voluntarily becomes intoxicated, she cannot use that intoxication as a defense to the crime, and she also cannot introduce evidence of her intoxication to prove that she did not have the requisite intent to commit the crime with which she has been charged. Moreover, the statute underscores that a defendant cannot use evidence of voluntary intoxication as part of an insanity defense, either. Exceptions to the Rule, and When Intoxication is Not Voluntary While most voluntary intoxication defenses will not work in Florida, there are some situations in which intoxication might be a defense to a criminal act in Florida. The statute specifically provides an exception when the defendant voluntarily took a lawful prescription drug that was prescribed to her, and the defendant became intoxicated unexpectedly. This defense may only be successful in cases where the defendant can prove that she was so intoxicated that she was unable to form intent—a key element of the crime. What about involuntary intoxication? This is a different matter altogether. When a defendant became involuntarily intoxicated—such as when she consumed a spiked drink or another substance unknowingly—then that defendant can indeed assert an intoxication defense. Contact a Florida Criminal Defense Lawyer The matter of an intoxication defense is complicated, and it is important to seek help with your case from an experienced Florida criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. Contact Moses & Rooth to get started on your defense.

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Hurricane Irma

Hurricane Irma, the most powerful Atlantic Ocean hurricane in recorded history is barreling its way to Florida. Governor Charlie Crist has declared that Florida is in a state of emergency. During the time of the storm you won’t see police on the roads. Security and electricity will be compromised. Homes and businesses are vulnerable to attack. As a result, you will unfortunately hear reports of thefts, burglaries and looting. What is Looting? Looting is theft during a declared state of emergency or natural disaster. In Florida, when a theft crime is committed during a State of Emergency that crime is enhanced which means it is classified one degree higher. For example, Florida is in a state of emergency. Soon businesses will be closed and homes will be evacuated. Under Florida’s anti-looting law, if a home or business was broken into and property stolen then a defendant could be subject to the anti-looting enhancement. Breaking into a business is normally a third degree felony and would now be a more serious second degree felony. Under Florida’s anti-looting law, what could be charged as a low level misdemeanor can now be automatically enhanced to a higher degree misdemeanor or higher-degree felony. Florida Statute 812.014 – Theft says: “However, if the property stolen within a county subject to a state of emergency declared by the Governor…, the theft is committed after the declaration of the emergency is made, and the perpetration of the theft is facilitated by condition arising from the emergency, the theft is a felony of the first degree…For purposes of sentencing under Chapter 921, a felony offense that is reclassified under this paragraph is ranked one level above the ranking under s. 921.002 or 921.0023 of the offense committed. Right now, Florida is in a state of emergency and if you find yourself charged with a looting crime our experienced Orlando criminal defense lawyers are able to help. The attorneys at Moses and Rooth will evaluate you case and aggressively defend you against your charges. Stay safe everyone.

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| Read Time: 3 minutes | Criminal Defense

2017 Scholarship Winner Essay by Aleschia Hyde

By Aleschia Hyde I am interested in this scholarship because I want to practice criminal or immigration law and the additional funds from the scholarship would help to defer many of the costs associated with law school while still allowing me to invest fully in my 1L coursework. Since college, I have worked and gone to school, thus sacrificing many hours of studying and networking. I would like to attend law school without the additional stress, if possible. Eventually, I want to pursue a career as a legal scholar. My undergraduate and graduate thesis work examined the way in which the state and individuals construct citizenship as well as the ways that the judiciary animates rights for marginalized people in Latin America. All legislative actions that place restrictions on firearms do not infringe on the Second Amendment right to bear arms or jeopardize its effectuate. There are typically two types of legislative actions that relate to firearms. Whereas the first type restricts where and when firearms can be used, the other type restricts who can use firearms. Neither type is mutually exclusive. Yet, the former, in my opinion, preserves the exercise of the second amendment, while the latter is more ambiguous, and thus more contentious. Laws that define where and when a firearm can be used do not limit an individual’s right to possess firearm. Therefore, these laws do not directly affect the Second Amendment, which stipulates that individuals have the right to have a weapon. For instance, there is great debate about whether there should be weapons in school. The Virginia Tech shootings and the Sandy Hook Massacre fueled this debate. In support of weapons in schools, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos contends that teachers may need a weapon to protect students from grizzly bears and potential threats. In contrast, many opponents of guns in schools cite the amount of money and training, not to mention gun safety concerns, firearms would place of school systems. Each argument recognizes the right for individuals to have guns, but strives to regulate the context in which they are employed. Still, this does not stop legislatures from debating or judiciaries from deliberating about these restrictions. On the contrary, legislation that restricts which individuals have access to firearms affects the exercise of the Second Amendment. With increased gun violence in urban cities like Chicago and mass shootings like the Orlando Nightclub Massacre, the ambiguity of the Second Amendment and its relationship to the security of the public and the private right to ensure one’s own safety is even more contentious. Following the attempted assassination of President Ronald Regan in the 1980s, the Brady Bill required gun purchasers to undergo background checks. Individuals could be denied a weapon in the name of public safety. In the wake of the Charleston Massacre in South Carolina in which nine African American churchgoers were slain, local and state governments called for restrictions on gun purchasing for individuals with documented mental health issues. Opponents of these restrictions such as the National Rifle Association (NRA) have lobbied politicians to vote against these efforts. For example, the NRA supports allowing individuals who are listed on the U.S. Terrorist Watch List to legally obtain weapons. The NRA predicates its argument on the Second Amendment. In their belief, to deny any individual from buying a firearm is a violation of the Second Amendment and threatens the rights of all gun owners. Thus, the amendment is evoked in these debates. To conclude, I do not believe that any restriction on firearms affects the Second Amendment. Indeed, the guns rights debate in the U.S. focuses primarily on the possession of weapons by certain people. However, there are debates that establish the ways individual use his or her weapons. This debate does not always compromise the Second Amendment and therefore, presents examples of firearm restrictions that do not affect the right to bear arms. Nonetheless, these debates are best resolved in the judicial system.

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Expungement vs. Sealed Records

A criminal record can affect your job and housing prospects years after your case is over. Even if you are never convicted of a crime, there is still a public record of your arrest and trial. But it is possible in certain cases to seal or expunge that public record, allowing you to legally state that you do not have a criminal record. How Do I Qualify for Sealing or Expunction? You can only have your criminal record sealed or expunged if you have never been convicted of a crime as an adult. (Juvenile criminal records are automatically expunged at age 21 in most cases.) Any prior criminal conviction, even for a DUI, renders you ineligible. A conviction can also include a case where you pleaded guilty or no contest and received a “withhold of adjudication” from the judge. You also can only have your criminal record sealed or expunged only once, excluding any automatic expunction of your juvenile record. This applies even if you previously had a record sealed or expunged in another state. You are also ineligible if you have any pending criminal case or on probation for any offense. How Does Sealing Differ From Expunction? If a criminal record is sealed, that simply means the public can no longer access it. By law, your record is still available to law enforcement and other government agencies, and you may still have to disclose any arrests to such agencies under certain circumstances. For example, if you seek to purchase a firearm or apply for a job at a public school, sealing your record will not prevent the disclosure of your prior arrests. If a record is expunged, in contrast, most government entities will no longer be able to access your criminal record at all without first obtaining a court order. You also do not need to acknowledge the arrests when asked about your criminal record. However, expunction does not actually eliminate your criminal record. It simply means that if a government agency tries to access your information without a court order, it will be informed the record has been expunged pursuant to Florida law. How Do I Actually Seek Sealing or Expungement? There is a two-stage process. First, you must submit an application with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) for a Certificate of Eligibility. If the Department issues the certificate, you then file a petition with a judge for an order actually granting the sealing or expunction. This petition should be filed in the same county court as where your initial arrest took place. Please note, the court is not required to grant your petition just because the FDLE issued you a certificate of eligibility. The court retains full discretion to grant or deny sealing and expungement requests as it sees fit. But you can always appeal an adverse decision, either from the FDLE or the court. Do I Need to Speak With an Orlando Expungement Attorney? Sealing or expunging a criminal record is not a simple or quick process. It requires dealing with the FDLE, the courts, and a complex web of legal requirements. Let our experienced Orlando criminal defense attorneys help you address your criminal record so you can move on with your life. Contact the offices of Moses & Rooth, Attorneys at Law, today at 407-377-0150.

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Common Criminal Charges Against School Teachers

Teachers exercise an important role in supervising and mentoring our children. It is a position of trust. And when that trust is violated, the legal consequences can be quite severe. We have all heard sensationalized stories in the news about teachers having sex with their underage students. Sometimes people write this off as a “victimless” crime. After all, if the student consented, what’s the harm? Florida law does not see it that way. The age of consent in Florida is 18. This is not a mere suggestion or guideline. Even if your teenager is “very mature for his or her age,” the law states that a person age 17 or younger cannot legally consent to participate in sexual activity. Florida Sex Crimes Involving a Teacher When a teacher has sexual intercourse (i.e. there is penetration) with a 16- or 17-year-old student, it is a felony. Specifically, if the teacher is at least 24 at the time, he or she faces up to 15 years in prison and a $10,000 fine. Even sexual activity short of penetration is a crime. If a teacher fools around with a student over the age of 12 by engaging in “sexual touching,” that is considered “lewd and lascivious molestation.” This can be charged up to a first-degree felony–punishable by 25 years to life in prison–if the student is younger than 12. Additionally, if a male teacher impregnates a female student as a result of sexual intercourse, he can be charged with “contributing to the delinquency of a minor.” This carries a potential prison sentence of 2 to 6 years. Keep in mind, any type of sex crimes conviction requires the defendant to register as a “sex offender” even after completing any prison sentence. Again, the fact the student agreed to have sex with a teacher is not a defense or a mitigating factor. Any sexual intercourse between a person over the age of 24 and a person under the age of 18 is illegal. Physical Abuse & Excessive Discipline In addition to sex crimes, Florida teachers may also face criminal charges if they physically abuse a student. This often comes up in the cases involving student discipline. For instance, in 2013 a fired Jacksonville teacher faced criminal charges after “allegedly punching a female middle-schooler in the face.” The teacher apparently had been trying to remove the unruly student from gym when the alleged punching occurred. And in 2014, a teacher in Coral Springs was charged with battery on a child after she allegedly made a 10-year-old student “clean a dirty urinal she thought the student had clogged.” Are You a Florida Teacher Charged With a Serious Crime? Especially in our social media-driven frenzy, there is often a rush to judgment against teachers accused of crimes against students. This is why if you are a Florida teacher charged, or even under investigation for, an illegal act involving a student, you need to speak with an experienced Orlando criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. Call the offices of Moses & Rooth, Attorneys at Law, at 407-377-0150 to speak with a lawyer right away.  

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Domestic Abuse and First Responders

Domestic violence is a complex issue. Many victims are afraid to come forward because they fear being judged. And many first responders train to render assistance, such as firefighters and paramedics, may not be properly trained to identify and properly deal with potential domestic violence situations. Orlando Joins Other Local Governments in Protecting Firefighters, EMTs It is important to remember that domestic violence is a crime. It is not simply a squabble or a “family matter.” Florida law defines domestic violence as any act of assault, battery, sexual assault, kidnapping, or any related crime against a family or household member. Because domestic abuse often involves physical violence, first responders need to be prepared for anything. Recently the Orlando Fire Department announced its firefighters will start wearing bulletproof vests when responding to emergency calls. Officially, this move was prompted by the June 2016 terrorist attack at the Pulse nightclub. But according to WFTV, OFD policy will also require use of the vests when its officers “show up to a domestic violence scene” and police “don’t have a suspect in custody.” One Orlando fire chief told WFTV that first responders are at risk in such scenarios because there may be an active shooter. The vests allow first responders to provide medical treatment for a domestic violence victim while still protecting themselves. Orlando is not alone in moving to protect its first responders. Last year NBC4 in Washington, DC, noted there were more than “60,000 domestic disturbance” cases in the national capital region annually. NBC4 said there were a number of cases where “officers responding” to a domestic violence call “were assaulted, injured,” and even killed. Similar to Orlando, many police departments in the area have outfitted their first responders with bulletproof vests. Do Florida First Responders Take Domestic Violence Seriously? But there are also concerns that first responders are not adequately trained to deal with potential domestic abuse cases. According to a January 2016 report on the media website Fusion, “too many EMTs and paramedics buy into the same myths about domestic violence as the public—namely, that the victim is somehow responsible for the abuse.” Fusion cited a study conducted by Florida State University of more than 400 Florida first responders. Of note, 1 out of 5 respondents “were neutral or agreed that ‘battered women secretly want to be abused.’” Similarly, about one-third of respondents thought domestic violence was a “normal reaction to day-to-day stress and frustration.” Protecting the Rights of the Accused Domestic abuse is never acceptable as a reaction to stress or any other provocation. But neither is unfairly charging someone with domestic violence without sufficient evidence. Unfortunately, just as some first responders are too dismissive of victims, some prosecutors and police are too eager to railroad an accused defendant. That is why if you have been accused of domestic violence you need to speak with an experienced Orlando criminal defense attorney who will stand up for your rights. Call the offices of Moses & Rooth, Attorneys at Law, today at 407-377-0150 if you need immediate legal assistance.

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