| Read Time: 2 minutes | Burglary

The Criminal Trial of a Notorious Florida Burglar has Begun

One of three Immokalee men will face charges stemming from a stretch of Florida home burglaries. The group became known as the “Ninja Robbers” and allegedly participated in burglaries from December 2013 to 2014. The dubbed “Ninja Robbers” dressed like ninjas by wearing all black and would break into houses all throughout the State of Florida. One of the defendants faces several charges, including kidnapping with the intent to commit a felony and robbery with a firearm or deadly weapon. Florida law defines burglary as entering the home of another person with the intent to commit an offense. The Criminal Trial of One of the Ninja Robbers is Underway Two of the three men known to the public as the “Ninja Robbers” recently pled guilty to 34 different Florida criminal charges. The Florida judge presiding over the case ordered lengthy prison sentences of 45 years to each defendant.  The men dressed in all black wearing masks entered Florida homes through unlocked doors and proceeded to hold the occupants at gunpoint. They used zip ties and duct tape to restrain them in some instances. The criminal charges to which they pled guilty include the following: Kidnapping with intent to commit a felony Carjacking with a firearm Dealing in stolen property Aggravated battery causing great bodily harm Home invasion robbery with a firearm Conspiracy to commit racketeering Racketeering The remaining man who rejected a plea deal will now face trial. A jury panel of six jurors and four alternate jurors will form, chosen out of a pool of 150 potential jurors. Finding jurors who have not seen any new articles, blog posts, photos, or heard any news about the “Ninja Robbers” will be difficult.   Fighting a Florida Burglary With a Firearm or Deadly Weapon Charge The crime of burglary in Florida requires someone to enter a dwelling, usually someone’s home or other dwelling structure, without permission and with intent to commit an offense. Entering a dwelling legally and remaining there without permission with the intent to commit an offense also constitutes burglary in Florida law.  Florida Burglary in the First Degree Charges First degree burglary is the most severe type of burglary crime. To commit burglary in the first degree, the offender must commit a burglary along with other aggravating factors. The suspect must enter a dwelling without permission with the intent to commit an offense, and also do one of the following: Enter with explosives or a dangerous weapon or weapons,  Commit an assault or battery upon another person, or Enter the structure using a motor vehicle as an instrument in committing the offense or causes damage to the property above $1,000. If You are Facing a Burglary Charge, We can Help Are you facing a Florida robbery or burglary charge? If so, Moses & Rooth Attorneys at Law can help. Our skilled Orlando criminal defense attorneys have helped many clients secure dismissals and receive not guilty verdicts. Burglary is a serious charge in Florida, especially if the defendant used a firearm or deadly weapon in the process. Hiring a skilled Orlando burglary defense attorney is wise. Contact our law firm today to schedule your free initial consultation.

Continue Reading

| Read Time: 2 minutes | Burglary

Police Investigate Suspect Killed in Winter Park Burglary

Police discovered a man who had been stabbed to death after receiving a report of a burglary at an apartment near Winter Park, Florida. Residents called the police to report that someone was trying to break into their apartment. When police arrived they found the suspect in the victim’s home with fatal stab wounds. Police reports have not released many details but police have reported that the residents knew the accused intruder. Police report that the man killed was the suspect in a similar burglary at the apartment that happened earlier in December. In an interesting twist, police recommended that the State’s Attorney’s Office file burglary charges against the deceased suspect. While all the facts are not clear, it is clear law enforcement believe burglary is a serious problem in Florida. If you are facing burglary charges you should understand the possible consequences of a burglary charge under Florida law. Consequences of a Burglary Conviction Florida’s burglary laws are confusing and complex. The charges you face depend on the facts of your case and the amount of evidence available to the prosecution. Generally, burglary occurs when an individual enters a dwelling or structure without permission and that individual intends to commit a burglary. First Degree Felony Burglary of a Dwelling First degree burglary felony is punishable with up to 30 years in prison. You can be convicted of first degree felony burglary of a dwelling if while entering a dwelling you: Assault or batter a victim; Arm yourself during the burglary; Become armed once you enter; Use a car to enter the building and damage it; Cause damage during the burglary which exceeds $1,000. Second Degree Felony Burglary Second degree felony burglary is punishable with up to 15 years in prison. A suspect is charged with this crime when the property involved is: A home or dwelling; An occupied structure; or An official emergency vehicle. Third Degree Felony Burglary If you burglarize a structure that is not a home and the structure is not occupied, then you may only face a third degree felony burglary charge. The charge of Burglary of a conveyance is a third degree felony. A conveyance is defined by Florida statute as any motor vehicle, vessel, ship railroad vehicle or car, trailer, sleeping car or aircraft. This offense is punishable with five years in prison and up to a $5,000 fine. Let an Attorney Help with Burglary Charges Similarly to robbery and other theft crimes, a burglary is a that which may cause other to question your integrity for years to come. You will need to disclose your conviction in many areas of life. People do not like the idea that someone in their environment would purposefully enter their home and take items. While you may be able to reform after the crime, the stigma will follow you for life. If you are facing burglary charges contact Moses & Rooth, we understand the nuances of the criminal justice system and can help you with a burglary charge. Contact us today 407-377-0150 to schedule an appointment.

Continue Reading

| Read Time: 2 minutes | Burglary

Theft, Robbery, and Burglary; What is the Difference?

Charges for theft, robbery, and burglary all involve the taking of another’s property, though the charges vary by how and where the activity took place. Being convicted of any of the above can bring serious penalties and long-term consequences, such as the possibility of future employment. If you have been charged with theft, robbery, or burglary, the experienced criminal defense attorneys of Moses and Rooth can provide a defense and help you put this behind you. Theft According to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE), a theft is committed every minute in Florida. Theft is the unauthorized taking or use of another’s property, including larceny, stealing, misappropriation, conversion, and other offenses. The value of the property determines if the theft is a petit theft or grand theft. Most cases of shoplifting are considered petit theft. Under Florida Statute 812.014, the theft will generally be a petit theft if the property taken was valued between $100 and $300 and not taken from a dwelling. Petit theft is a misdemeanor. For property taken valuing over $300 the theft will generally be a grand theft and a felony either in the first, second, or third degree, depending on the value of the property, whether a vehicle was used during the commission of the theft, or if any property damage occurred because of the theft. Robbery According to the FDLE, a robbery happens every 22 minutes. A robbery is when a person takes money or property from another person with intent to permanently or temporarily deprive that person of the money or property by force, violence, assault, or fear. Burglary According to the FDLE, a burglary occurs every three minutes in Florida. A person can be charged with burglary if the person enters or remains in a building with the intent to commit a crime. Burglary is a felony of the first, second, or third degree depending on the circumstances. Under Florida Statute 810.02, burglary is a felony of the third degree if the offender does not commit an assault, battery, carry a weapon, or explosive, and there is not another person within the structure or conveyance burglarized. Burglary is a felony of the second degree if the offender does not commit an assault, battery, carry a weapon, or explosive, but there is another person in the dwelling entered or remained in, remains in a dwelling where there is not another person, or there is another person in a structure or conveyance burglarized. Burglary is a felony of the first degree if the offender commits an assault or battery, becomes armed within the dwelling, structure, or conveyance with a weapon or explosive, uses a motor vehicle other than for a getaway vehicle, or causes over $1,000 worth of property damage to the dwelling, structure, or conveyance. Defenses to burglary include arguing that the building was open to the public or you had an invitation or license to be there. Whether you are charged with theft, robbery, or burglary all can carry serious repercussions and long-term consequences. If you have been charged with a theft, robbery, or burglary, contact the experienced criminal defense attorneys at Moses and Rooth in Florida for the best possible defense and for a chance to move past this difficult point in your life.

Continue Reading